Posted in Book Review, Books I have read

The Safest Place – Suzanne Bugler

Contemporary Fiction 4*'s
Contemporary Fiction
4*’s

Suzanne Bugler’s books all concentrate on family relationships, her descriptions so good that each time I read one of her books it feels like I am peeking through the windows on someone else’s life.

In the safest Place starts with Jane persuading her husband to live their dream, this couple’s dream is to live in the country. Once Jane decides that she wants to move and once broached she quickly escalates her wishes to a full blown campaign to make the move happen. The couples two children, a quiet son Sam and a younger daughter Ella are promised an idyllic life but the dream soon becomes a little troubled as reality encroaches.

I don’t read Suzanne Bugler’s books for an action packed read, her books are far more about observing people and their relationships, however I was surprised that it took quite so long for the event to happen that is to change everything for all of them. The relationships are well observed, mother to teenage son, the envy Jane hopes to inspire to her London friends to that she feels towards her new friend in the country .the sadness of a marriage under strain and the way Jane feels like a teenage daughter when conversing with her own parents are all perfectly drawn.

Suzanne Bugler is an expert on mothers of all types as illustrated in her previous two books This Perfect World and The Child Inside

The Child InsideThe Child Inside by Suzanne Bugler

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This is another great book from Suzanne Bugler. Unlike Laura in This Perfect World Rachel, the protagonist of The Child Inside, isn’t one of the yummy mummy’s. Rachel has spent her life on the periphery of everyone else’s life wanting to be part of the group but instead had the role of the observer in life.

Giving birth to a still-born daughter ten years previously caused Rachel to draw her husband Andrew and son Jono close to her. Poor Jono has been Rachel and Andrew’s shield against the world and the centre of theirs. Suzanne Bugler’s descriptions of the cloying and suffocating result are so realistic it is almost painful and as a reader we observe Jono struggling with growing up and fighting against his parents. Rachel is then drawn back to the past and the death of a friend of a friend who died aged sixteen, following her mother and trying to involve herself in her life. As Rachel’s interest in the past increases her marriage disintegrates further. Rachel can’t let go of the past but thinks she has found a way to live her life….

As in This Perfect World the author’s words bring the scene’s to life. Her observations on how cruel, selfish and unkind the human race can be are captured perfectly creating dark and compelling stories. I can’t wait for the next one!

View all my reviews

or for Suzanne Bugler’s debut A Perfect World

This Perfect WorldThis Perfect World by Suzanne Bugler

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

What a thought-provoking read!

This book is well written and very engaging.

Despite not liking the protaganist Laura at the start of the book it was a compelling read. The stories of life in the playground were uncomfortably realistic as were those of the “school mums.” I am sure we all know or have known people like these.

The book is really about the consequences of our actions, Laura has to atone for her actions as a child and in the process quesitons her current life.

This is not an easy book to read but I was engrossed and wanted to find out why Laura’s parents were so keen for the girls to be friends.

Looking forward to the next book by Suzanne Bugler

View all my reviews

If you enjoy Suzanne Bugler’s books you may also enjoy books by Heather Gudenkauf

Author:

A book lover who clearly has issues as obsessed with crime despite leading a respectable life

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