Posted in Book Review, Books I have read

The Rosie Effect – Graeme Simsion

Contemporary Fiction 4*'s
Contemporary Fiction
4*’s

This is what happens to Rosie and Don almost a year after we last met them in The Rosie Project, you really do need to have read that book first to get the most from this one.

Rosie and Don are now living in an apartment in New York, making cocktails together at the local bar to supplement Rosie’s medical training while Don studies the effect of alcohol on rats in his role as Geneticist at the university. Unfortunately there is a domino effect of disasters ready to strike just around the corner, if not caused by Don’s inability to see the world in the same way as the average person, then certainly compounded by this fact.

Some of the secondary characters from the original book make an appearance in this one but I have to say even these aren’t quite as bright and sparkly as they were, it is almost as if by getting older the world is not quite so full of opportunities and life has become more ordinary, except for Don whose character has stayed entirely intact with a few minor modifications such as the modification to his daily eating plan. However much you like Don though, the other characters are required to move the story along so that it doesn’t get too bogged down in Don’s logic and this time the relief and most touching instances come from Don bonding with his male friends over a game of Baseball.  Graeme Simsion has successfully taken four disparate blokes and given them a way to bond which is entirely male, and in keeping with Don’s character and allowed us to see what goes on behind the raw actions of these men.  Gene was a surprise and it depends which way you read one episode to whether or not he gets the prize for the most-misunderstood man in the book.  Overall the writing was of the same standard of the original although some of the situations appeared to be a little bit forced and didn’t really have any real purpose.

Because the overall feel was slightly more downbeat I didn’t get the same enjoyment from this episode, it was still funny but not quite as sweet as The Rosie Project and the subject covered isn’t as unique, in fact Don’s reaction to the news isn’t so out of the ordinary for any man, Don just takes it to a slightly different level. Rosie’s character was much harder in this book, something necessary for the plot but disappointing for this reader as it added to the more downbeat tone, you can’t hook up with a man like Don and then decide in such a short space of time that he isn’t up to the job! That is just not fair Rosie!!

On balance I will still be recommending The Rosie Project to everyone who asks for a good book but this is one for die-hard fans to read with the knowledge that perhaps that original magic can’t be replicated in another episode.

I’d like to say a big thank you to Penguin Books UK who kindly gave me a copy of this book in return for this honest review. The Rosie Effect will be published on 25 September 2014.

Posted in Weekly Posts

WWW Wednesday (September 17)

WWW Wednesday green

Hosted by Miz B at Should be Reading

To play along, just answer the following three (3) questions…
• What are you currently reading?
• What did you recently finish reading?
• What do you think you’ll read next?

I am currently reading One Last Dance by Judith Lennox

One Last Dance

Blurb

‘Times change, and sometimes for the better…’
As the twentieth century draws to a close, Esme Reddaway knows that she must uncover the truth. A truth that began during the First World War when Devlin Reddaway fell passionately in love with Esme’s elder sister, Camilla, and promised to rebuild his ancestral home, Rosindell, for her.
But the war changes everything and Devlin returns to England to find that Camilla is engaged to someone else. Angry and vengeful, he marries Esme, who has been secretly in love with him for years. Esme tries to win Devlin’s heart by reviving the annual summer dance. But as the years pass she fears that Rosindell has a malign influence on those who live there, and the revelation of a shocking secret on the night of the dance at Rosindell tears her life apart. Decades later, it is she who must lay the ghosts of Rosindell to rest.
Spanning the last century, Esme’s story of sibling rivalry, heartbreak, betrayal and forgiveness is sure to appeal to fans of Kate Morton, Rachel Hore and Downton Abbey. Goodreads

I have just finished reading The Rosie Effect by Graeme Simsion, my review will be following soon.

The Rosie Effect

Blurb

GREETINGS. My name is Don Tillman. I am forty-one years old. I have been married to Rosie Jarman, world’s most perfect woman, for ten months and ten days.
Marriage added significant complexity to my life. When we relocated to New York City, Rosie brought three maximum-size suitcases. We abandoned the Standardised Meal System and agreed that sex should not be scheduled in advance.
Then Rosie told me we had ‘something to celebrate’, and I was faced with a challenge even greater than finding a partner.
I have attempted to follow traditional protocols and have sourced advice from all six of my friends, plus a therapist and the internet.
The result has been a web of deceit. I am now in danger of prosecution, deportation and professional disgrace.
And of losing Rosie forever. Goodreads

Next I am going to read The Dark Meadow by Andrea Maria Schenkel

The Dark Meadow

Blurb

Bavaria, Germany, 1947
At the end of the war, Afra Zauner returns to her parents’ cottage on the edge of Mauther Forest. Unmarried, and pregnant. As she struggles to raise her child, her father’s shame, her mother’s fury and the loud whispers of the neighbours begin to weigh upon her. She doesn’t believe in her sin. But everyone else does.
And someone brings judgement down upon her.
Many years later, Hermann Müller is throwing a drunk out of his tavern. A traveller, who won’t stop ranting about a murder left unsolved, about police who never investigated. Out of curiousity, the file is reopened. And in the cold light of hindsight, a chilling realisation creeps upon the community.
No-one ever atoned for Afra’s death. But her story is waiting to be told.
Andrea Maria Schenkel returns to the form of her groundbreaking The Murder Farm, narrating through suspects, victims and investigators to lead the reader to their own awful understanding. Goodreads

Please share your reads with me in the comments box below.

Posted in Weekly Posts

Teaser Tuesday (September 16)

Tuesday Teaser

Teaser Tuesdays is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by MizB of Should Be Reading.

My teaser this week is from The Rosie Effect by Graeme Simsion which is the sequel to the fabulous The Rosie Project

The Rosie Effect

Blurb

With the Wife Project complete, Don settles into a new job and married life in New York. But it’s not long before certain events are taken out of his control and it’s time to embark on a new project . . .
As Don tries to get to grips with the requirements of starting a family, his unusual research style gets him into trouble. To make matters worse, Don has invited his closest friend to stay with them, but Gene is not exactly the best model for marital happiness. As Don’s life with Rosie continues to be unpredictable, he needs to remember that emotional support is just as important as practical expertise. NetGalley

My Teaser

It was 9.27 p.m. when  I arrived home from Dave’s. Rosie flung her arms around me and began crying.  I had learned that it was better not to attempt to interpret such behaviour at the time, or to seek clarification as to the specific emotion being expressed, even though such  information would have been useful in formulating a response.  Instead, I adopted the tactic recommended by Claudia and assumed the persona of Gregory Peck’s character in The Big Country.

Please leave the link to your teaser in the comment box below.

Posted in Weekly Posts

Friday Finds (September 5)

Friday Finds Hosted by Should be Reading

FRIDAY FINDS showcases the books you ‘found’ and added to your To Be Read (TBR) list… whether you found them online, or in a bookstore, or in the library — wherever! (they aren’t necessarily books you purchased).

So, come on — share with us your FRIDAY FINDS

I have found some great books this week and I’m going to start with The Rosie Effect by Graeme Simsion due to be published on 25 September the sequel to The Rosie Project which I loved.

The Rosie Effect

Blurb

With the Wife Project complete, Don settles into a new job and married life in New York. But it’s not long before certain events are taken out of his control and it’s time to embark on a new project . . .
As Don tries to get to grips with the requirements of starting a family, his unusual research style gets him into trouble. To make matters worse, Don has invited his closest friend to stay with them, but Gene is not exactly the best model for marital happiness. As Don’s life with Rosie continues to be unpredictable, he needs to remember that emotional support is just as important as practical expertise. NetGalley

I also have a copy of This Little Piggy by Bea Davenport which is due to be published on 1 October 2014.

This Little Piggy
strong>Blurb

It’€™s the summer of 1984 and there is a sense of unease on the troubled Sweetmeadows estate. The residents are in shock after the suspicious death of a baby and tension is growing due to the ongoing miners’€™ strike. Journalist Clare Jackson follows the story as police bungle the inquiry and struggle to contain the escalating violence. Haunted by a personal trauma she can’t face up to, Clare is shadowed by nine-year-old Amy, a bright but neglected little girl who seems to know more about the incident than she’€™s letting on. As the days go on and the killer is not found, Clare ignores warnings not to get too close to her stories and, in doing so, puts her own life in jeopardy.

I have a copy of Summer of Ghosts by P.D. Viner, a physical book courtesy of Amazon Vine and chosen because I enjoyed The Last Winter of Dani Lancing

Summer of Ghosts

Blurb

It begins with a father calling his daughter, but whoever answers is not Pia but his daughter’s killer. He must listen, horrified, to the sounds of his only child being murdered, powerless to intervene as the killer utters two chilling words.
Most men’s thoughts would turn to vengeance but Pia’s father is far more resourceful than most. And he is not the reserved businessman his daughter always believed him to be but Franco, a notorious London drug lord who will call in all his debts to find his daughter’s killer. Including the one owed to him by DI Tom Bevans.
Only Tom is a man haunted by his own grief and every unsolved case weighs heavily against his soul. And Tom has heard the killer’s words before. Goodroads

After reading a fantastic post about this A Hank of Hair by Charlotte Jay on Confessions of a Book Novelist entitled In The Spotlight: Charlotte Jay’s A Hank of Hair

A Hank of Hair
Blurb

Gilbert Hand hasn’t been the same since his wife died. He’s moved to a dull but respectable hotel where silence seems to brood in the hall and stairway. In a secret drawer he discovers a long, thick hank of human hair, and his world narrows down to two people – himself and the murderer. Goodreads

To read more about this book read Margot’s review here

After reading an excellent review of The Guardian by Matthew Iden on My Train of Thought Karen informed me that the first in the Marty Singer series, A Reason to Live by Matthew Iden was free on kindle, so I quickly downloaded a copy.

A reason to live

Blurb

In the late nineties, a bad cop killed a good woman and DC Homicide detective Marty Singer watched the murderer walk out of the courtroom a free man.
Twelve years later, the victim’s daughter begs for help: the killer is stalking her now. But Marty has retired to battle cancer. A second shot at the killer–and a first chance at redemption–Marty has A Reason to Live. Goodreads

What have you found this week? Please share your finds with me in the comments below.