Posted in Book Review, Books I have read

The Missing Hours – Emma Kavanagh

Crime Fiction 4*s
Crime Fiction
4*s

Well Emma Kavanagh has done it again, by which I mean give me an entertaining and well-written novel and at the same time educate me about an area I am totally unfamiliar with; kidnap and ransom demands.

The Missing Hours is a mystery, it has elements of a police procedural where DS Finn Hale and his sister DC Leah Mackay are on police force firstly investigating the disappearance of Dr Selina Cole and then later, when a body is discovered, the brutal murder of solicitor Dominic Newell. Leah is drawn towards Selina’s story; why would a woman walk away from a playground where her two children are playing, and disappear? Finn feels her connection with this case when he, her superior, feels that the largest portion of resources should be pooled on the murder committed in Cardiff, may be related to her personal feelings, she is identifying just a little bit too much perhaps? But this isn’t a straightforward police procedural with elements of the psychology behind crime also being explored during this novel.

It took me a while to get into the swing of this book, as in her previous books, Emma Kavanagh has used multiple points of view, ranging from Heather, Selina’s daughter to the police, and different time periods to unveil the different strands of the story. Those illustrating the work that Selina carried out for the kidnap and ransom negotiations are covered in historical case files. These make for fascinating but from my perspective, a more remote type of interest, and I certainly learnt a lot about this little-reported crime and its resolutions in dangerous spots across the globe.

This book is a master in misdirection, I changed my mind numerous times about who was responsible for different elements but try as I might I couldn’t get any scenario to fit all the facts I was in possession of but of course Emma Kavanagh didn’t let me down and when all is finally revealed, I was reminder just how superb this author is at plotting a complex novel.

Maybe because many of the characters lived lives I find it hard to imagine, of live a lifestyle that depend upon them playing their cards very close to their chests either in the forces or carrying out difficult commissions to find kidnap victims, I didn’t find I connected terribly well with any of them except the two police officers. That isn’t to say these other characters aren’t well-drawn, I think it is probably that they were too realistic thereby while their actions were understandable, I just didn’t feel like I belonged in their world.

Perhaps because of the remoteness of some of the characters and getting to grips with the world of a company whose purpose is negotiating the release of those kidnapped it did take me far longer to get into this book than the author’s previous two novels – this isn’t a book to read for non-stop action as it does take a while for the pace to pick up. Once it did though, I was gripped and longing to know exactly who to believe made the dénouement totally worth the wait! A word of warning here though, this book ends very abruptly so much so that I actually thought I’d clicked over the last page, so readers who don’t like ambiguous endings may be disappointed with having to imagine what comes next! For those lovers of crime fiction who want something a little different from the twisted serial killer, this is a strong contender.

I’d like to say a huge thank you to the publishers Random House UK who allowed me to read a copy of The Missing Hours ahead of publication on 21 April 2016. This honest review is my thank you to them.

Previous books by Emma Kavanagh

Falling
Hidden

Posted in Book Review, Books I have read, Five Star Reads

To Catch a Killer – Emma Kavanagh

Crime Fiction
5*s

Emma Kavanagh manages to write crime fiction almost in the tone of someone who has experienced the very events herself. Perhaps this isn’t so surprising given her background as she spent many years working as a police and military psychologist, training firearms officers, command staff and military personnel throughout the UK and Europe. In other words she knows how people behave in moments of peril!

To Catch a Killer opens in the middle of just such a moment, the kind of moment that I suspect I am alone in being able to thankfully say, I have not experienced in real life. Just as well because the book scared the bejeebers out of me! The memory of a day, one just like any other until the day DS Alice Parr answered a call on the radio to assist a paramedic save the life of a woman who had her throat cut. Warning, do not read this book if you are squeamish or eating your dinner, that feeling of being in the moment results in those heart-thumping moments you get viewing hospital dramas – you know it is fiction but even so…

Once the victim has been taken to hospital of course the police have to work out who the perpetrator of such a crime is and given that the attack took place in a London park, in the morning, how could they commit such a bloody crime in broad daylight with no one spotting what was going on?

So the reader has plenty to ponder and be warned although initially you may feel the pace is reasonable, it soon becomes quite fast and furious and given that the plot is complex, you need your wits about you. In other words this is a book to set aside some time to really get the best out of it. Fortunately to offset the blood and gore we have two female police officers who work well together, Polly’s somewhat less serious nature while not detracting from the crime does give the reader some smiles to lighten the load along the way.

We also get to visit another location, unusual in British crime fiction which normally tends to stay fairly close to home with a big deal being made if officers cross into the next county. In this book they have to get on an airplane to carry out some of the investigating which adds a whole different feel to the storyline.

The result of all this is an immensely satisfying crime fiction novel that really held my interest throughout and although I did manage to work out a tiny bit of the puzzle, the rest worked their magic and left me reeling at the outcome. This is the first in a trilogy that will feature Alice Parr a fact I was unaware of until I read the cliff hanger at the end which I have to confess isn’t my favourite way for a book to end as I suspect I will have to recap before the second book is published, but I will definitely be making sure I read a copy.

I therefore must say a huge thank you to Orion Publishing Group for allowing me to read a copy of To Catch a Killer prior to publication on 24 January 2019. This unbiased review is my thanks to them.

First Published UK: 24 January 2019
Publisher: Orion
No of Pages: 416
Genre: Crime Fiction
Amazon UK
Amazon US

Other Great Reads by Emma Kavanagh

Falling
Hidden
The Missing Hours
Killer on the Wall

 

Posted in Weekly Posts

First Chapter ~ First Paragraph (January 8)

Welcome to another Tuesday celebrating bookish events, from Tuesday/First Chapter/Intros, hosted by Vicky from I’d Rather Be At The Beach who posts the opening paragraph (sometime two) of a book she decided to read based on the opening. Feel free to grab the banner and play along.

Well we have a new year and that means a whole heap of brand new books to read, what could be better? OK well if they were accompanied by a sun-drenched holiday complete with cocktails but… a fire & a blanket in a cold January will have to suffice!

My choice of opening this week comes from To Catch a Killer by Emma Kavanagh, author of Hidden, The Missing HoursThe Killer on the Wall and Falling, all excellent psychological thrillers that truly thrill. To Catch a Killer will be published by Orion on 24 January 2019.

 

Blurb

I’ve been watching you DS Alice Parr.
I saw you trying to save the poor young woman you found in the park.
The woman I tried to kill.
I’ve been waiting for you to find her family. To find someone who cares about her.
But you can’t can you?
You’ve never had a case like this.
I know everything about you. You know nothing about me.
Even though I’m the man you’re looking for.
And you will never catch me… Amazon

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

First Chapter ~ First Paragraph ~ Intro

Prologue

 

When I think about that day, when I think about her, it is her hands that I remember most. Long, patrician fingers, the nails shaped into a smooth arc, filed with a care that even to this day, baffles me. The muted pink of them so perfectly applied, the blood that had worked its way into the creases of her fingers, ghoulish and macabre besides the effortless glamour. I remember the way her fingers clutched mine, those perfect nails raking at my palm as if I represented the final rung on a falling ladder, and that by holding on to me she could hold on to a rapidly disappearing life. Perhaps that was true. Perhaps that was precisely what I was to her.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Yes it looks very much like I’ve started 2019’s opening post with a full on psycho killer – I mean really, not knowing from experience but I doubt the quality of someone’s manicure is what preoccupies most murderers…  Can’t wait to see what other treats this book has in store!

What do you think? Would you keep reading?

Posted in Book Review, Books I have read

The Killer on the Wall – Emma Kavanagh

Psychological Thriller
4*s

Isla was just fifteen when she came across three dead bodies sat up against Hadrian’s Wall. Alongside them was the brother of one of the victims, injured but still alive. Isla ran to get help from her father Sergeant Eric Bell and he made it his mission to find out who committed this atrocity in the small town community of Briganton. Life was never the same again, the scars of the events of 1995 never quite healing.

In the present day Isla is Professor of Criminal Psychology, her way of trying to ensure that future killers are stopped before they inflict any damage. She is currently involved in a project to scan the brains of serial killers to see what, if any difference, she can find to contrast their make-up to the vast majority of the population who don’t feel the urge to kill others.

It is no great surprise that one of the candidates for her study is Heath McGowan the man convicted of the terrible crimes that she discovered. Isla has had to overcome her fear, she does it daily, running the same path along the wall to banish those demons from twenty years ago but will she be able to face up to this particular psychopath? Imagine Isla’s horror shared with the rest of the small community, when another victim is found positioned in a similar pose to those of all those years ago.

The face of the Police investigation should be Eric Bell whose career flourished after he found the killer back in 1995 but I was far more entranced by Detective Constable Mina Arian who wasn’t afraid to follow her instincts in coming up with an explanation why the killings have started again.

As with all her previous books Emma Kavanagh draws heavily on her background in psychology, having gained a PhD in the subject at Cardiff University, and so you can rest assured this is not pop psychology but the real deal. It is this underlying truth that make her books so fascinating. The Killer on the Wall is fundamentally about psychopaths and in part how to first spot them (face it, you will know at least one) and to know that they will lie and cheat to get what they want no matter the cost to others. Fortunately for the rest of us, not all psychopaths need to kill us but nevertheless this is a book that hits that nerve where you realise that even in a community where everyone knows each other, you’re not as safe as you would like to believe.

The plot is not as fast moving as in the author’s previous books but as I’ve mentioned before, I’ve come to appreciate the slower pace which gives you time to reflect on the knowledge gained so far and I firmly believe that it is this pace that gives headroom for those deep-seated fears so the tension comes from as much within the reader as the words on the page – far more scary!!

I’d like to thank Arrow for providing me with an ARC of The Killer on the Wall, this review is my thanks to them and the immensely talented Emma Kavanagh – thank you for providing me with a real mystery set in a small town where everyone is under suspicion whilst the majority are terrified out of their wits.

First Published UK: 20 April 2017
Publisher: Arrow
No of Pages:  384
Genre: Psychological Thriller
Amazon UK
Amazon US

Other Great Reads by Emma Kavanagh

Falling
Hidden
The Missing Hours

Posted in Books I have read

Take Three Shorts

Short stories which link to other books seems to be a fairly new phenomenon but one I have to admit I was a bit suspicious of – surely the book itself should be enough? Do we really need another part to complete our reading experience?

In the interest of science I have put three to the test!

First up is Case 48: The Kidnapping of Isaiah Rae by Emma Kavanagh which was published shortly before the author’s latest novel The Missing Hours – this short is currently free and runs to 35 pages. Case 48 features Selena and Ed Cole, from The Missing Hours .

Case 48

When Elliot, the son of an electronics corporation CEO, is kidnapped and held for ransom, Selena and Ed are brought in to act as liasons. To make sure things run smoothly. To make sure Elliot comes home.
But when Selena discovers that Elliot’s biological mother was recently released from prison, things soon become more complicated, and more deadly, than they can possibly imagine … Amazon

Although this features two of the characters from the novel this is an entirely standalone story, and a good one at that. This short story, would give the reader insight into the work of those who work for the insurance company in kidnap and ransom demands. If like me you had no idea this industry existed, this story may just be the introduction you need to see if you’d enjoy a full length novel in this area.

Flourish.jpg

My second short is The Intruder at Number 40 by Louise Candlish, an author I was delighted to discover from the book this is linked to; The Sudden Departure of the Frasers. This short comes in at 33 pages and is currently 49p and features Amber Fraser of the title…

The Intruder at Number 40

He sold 40 Lime Park Road months ago. So why is he still visiting the house?
Ryan Steer is an estate agent in property hotspot Lime Park, gatekeeper to a growing population of well-heeled families and affluent couples attracted by the area’s promise of a tranquil suburban lifestyle. To be honest, the houses sell themselves, and when Ryan hands over the keys to his vendors he usually wishes them well and loses their faces in the crowd. Until Jeremy and Amber Fraser, that is. For there is something about Mrs Fraser that gets under his skin, something that causes illicit thoughts, thoughts that lead to actions – secret, forbidden ones.
But if ever a woman was worth the risk, it is Amber Fraser. Amazon

The Intruder at Number 40 was released earlier this year in the run up to the authors fantastic tale The Swimming Pool, so perhaps the idea was to get the authors name in the forefront of the readers mind in readiness. Again this was an enjoyable enough story, but apart from the house at Lime Grove, the very one the Frasers departed from, there isn’t anything in this book that adds to what we already know from reading the full-length novel, this was rather a stand alongside type of read. For me the book was just long enough for the tale it told, which would certainly make me wary of estate agents!

Flourish.jpg

My last choice was Here be Dragons by Sharon Bolton with a short story featuring two of my favourite characters Lacey Flint and Mark Joesbury and ties in with the end of A Dark and Twisted Tide, which was the fourth in the Lacey Flint series. This short story comes in at about double the length of the previous two and is currently priced at £1.99.

Here Be Dragons

There must be a thousand people in the vicinity of Westminster Bridge on this beautiful evening . . . in approximately thirty minutes’ time, many of them will be dead.
Mark Joesbury, of Scotland Yard’s Covert Operations Unit, is undercover. Embroiled in a terrorist gang’s plans for a deadly attack at the heart of the capital, he’s risking everything to stop them. But as they prepare to target London’s most iconic landmarks, it’s no longer just countless strangers he’s fighting to save. Because they’ve also got the woman he loves, DC Lacey Flint… Amazon

Here Be Dragons is my favourite of all three of the shorts because it does add something to the end of the last story. Maybe this is a sweetener for those of us who were hoping for another episode of Lacey Flint – although personally my disappointment has been assuaged by the new standalone book, Daisy In Chains which is going to be published next month. In this book we get to hear what Mark Joesbury is doing while he is missing from Lacey’s life – and the longer length mean that there is time for some proper thrills! I’m so glad I read this one and fully recommend it for all lovers of Lacey Flint.

Flourish.jpg

So three very different shorts all from my favourite authors with somewhat mixed results but perhaps nowhere near as negative as I feared. I’m not a huge fan of short stories and I was a little wary of feeling that I’d been conned into buying a book that I wouldn’t find satisfying. That didn’t happen with any of these books but perhaps it isn’t so surprising that I most enjoyed the longest offering. I also got an awful lot of enjoyment from meeting up with old favourite characters, far more than I expected. My conclusion is that for a quick read then a story that links with a much loved book may well be the way to go!

The Missing HoursThe Sudden Departrure of the FrasersA Dark and Twisted Tide NG

 

What do you think about short stories specifically written to tie-in with full-length novels?

Posted in Weekly Posts

This Week in Books (April 13)

This Week In Books

Lypsyy Lost & Found my Wednesday post gives you a taste of what I am reading this week. A similar meme is run by Taking on a World of Words

At the moment I am reading The Missing Hours by Emma Kavanagh, the author of both Falling and Hidden, both of which I awarded five stars, can she make it a hat-trick? You’ll have to wait for my review to find out!

The Missing Hours

A woman disappears
One moment, Selena Cole is in the playground with her children and the next, she has vanished without a trace.
A woman returns
Twenty hours later, Selena is found safe and well, but with no memory of where she has been.
What took place in those missing hours, and are they linked to the discovery of a nearby murder? NetGalley

The Missing Hours will be published by Random House UK on 21 April 2016.

I have just finished When She Was Bad by Tammy Cohen

When She Was Bad

To read the synopsis and a short excerpt please see yesterday’s post

Next up is one of my kindle purchases, this time something a little different; The Closet of Savage Memories by Nuala Ní Chonchúir

The Closet of Savage Memories

Blurb

Lillis takes a summer job working at a lodge in a small lochside village in the Scottish Highlands. Leaving home is a way to escape her sorrow and despair following the death of her boyfriend and a testy relationship with her mother, Verity.
In Scotland she encounters love and excitement but when a series of unexpected events turn her new found life on its head, she is forced to make a life-changing decision, one that will stay with her for her whole life.
The Closet of Savage Mementos is drawn directly from the author’s own experiences and explores heartbreak, loss, motherhood and adoption in a gripping narrative and the same expressive, emotive and exciting prose we have come to expect of Nuala Ní Chonchúir. Amazon

What are you reading this week? Do share your thoughts in the comments below

2016 Book Reviews with Links

Classic

An Awfully Big Adventure – Beryl Bainbridge (1989)

Harriet Said – Beryl Bainbridge (1972)

The Murder at the Vicarage – Agatha Christie (1930)

The Murder of Roger Ackroyd – Agatha Christie (1926)

The Shrimp and the Anemone – L.P. Hartley (1944)

Sweet William – Beryl Bainbridge (1975)

Contemporary

The Accidental Life of Greg Millar – Aimee Alexander (2016)

Beside Myself – Ann Morgan (2016)

The Closet of Savage Mementos – Nuala Ní Chonchúir (2014)

Five Rivers Met on a Wooded Plain – Barney Norris (2016)

I Found You – Lisa Jewell (2016)

The Museum of You – Carys Bray (2016)

My Name is Leon – Kit de Waal (2016)

My Name is Lucy Barton – Elizabeth Strout (2016)

The One-in-a-Million Boy – Monica Wood (2016)

Other People’s Secrets – Louise Candlish (2010)

The People in the Photo –  Hélène Gestern (2014)

Small Great Things – Jodi Picoult (2016)

The Stranger in My Home – Adele Parks (2016)

The Things We Keep – Sally Hepworth (2016)

Truly Madly Guilty – Liane Moriarty (2016)

The Twins – Saskia Sarginson (2013)

The Versions of Us – Laura Barnett (2015)

The War of the Wives – Tamar Cohen (2012) 

Crime

A Deadly Thaw – Sarah Ward (2016)

A Man With One of Those Faces – Caimh McDonnell (2016)

A Savage Hunger – Claire McGowan (2016)

A Tapping At My Door – David Jackson (2016)

The Bad Things – Mary-Jane Riley (2015)

The Beautiful Dead – Belinda Bauer (2016)

Blackwater – James Henry (2016)

Blood Lines – Angela Marsons (2016)

Buried Angels – Camilla Läckberg (2014)

The Chemistry of Death – Simon Beckett (2006)

Coffin Road – Peter May (2016)

The Coffin Trail – Martin Edwards (2004)

Cut To The Bone – Alex Caan (2016)

Daisy In Chains – Sharon Bolton (2016)

The Dead Hour – Denise Mina (2006)

Dead Pretty – David Mark (2016)

The Ex – Alafair Burke (2016)

The Facts of Life and Death – Belinda Bauer (2014)

The Field of Blood – Denise Mina (2005)

For All Our Sins – T.M.E. Walsh (2011)

Found Near Water – Katherine Hayton (2014)

In Bitter Chill – Sarah Ward (2015)

Kill Me Again – Rachel Abbott (2016)

Laidlaw – William McIlvanney (1977)

The Last Days of Summer – Vanessa Ronan (2016)

Lie In Wait – G.J. Minett (2016)

Little Bones – Sam Blake (2016)

Love You Dead – Peter James (2016)

The Missing Hours – Emma Kavanagh (2016)

My Sister’s Bones – Nuala Ellwood (2016)

The Narrow Bed – Sophie Hannah (2016)

No Man’s Nightingale – Ruth Rendell (2013)

Out of Bounds – Val McDermid (2016)

Pariah – David Jackson (2014)

Pictures of Perfection – Reginald Hill (1994)

Play Dead – Angela Marsons (2016)

The Promise – Alison Bruce (2016)

Rat Run – Caro Ramsay (2016)

Shot Through The Heart – Isabelle Grey (2016)

The Siren – Alison Bruce (2011)

Standing in the Shadows – Jon Stasiak (2015)

Tastes Like Fear – Sarah Hilary (2016)

They Did It With Love – Kate Morganroth (2007)

The Trespasser – Tana French (2016)

The Two O’clock Boy – Mark Hill (2016)

Without Trace – Simon Booker (2016)

The Woman in Blue – Elly Griffiths (2016)

Historical

Another Day Gone – Eliza Graham (2016)

The Ballroom – Anna Hope (2016)

The Blood Card – Elly Griffiths (2016)

Burial Rites – Hannah Kent (2013)

Death at the Seaside – Frances Brody (2016)

The House of Birds – Morgan McCarthy (2016)

The Jeweller’s Wife – Judith Lennox (2016)

His Bloody Project – Graeme Macrae Burnet (2015)

The Kill Fee – Fiona Veitch Smith (2016)

Kindred – Steve Robinson (2016)

The Lake House – Kate Morton (2015)

The Little Stranger – Sarah Waters (2009)

The Shadow Hour – Kate Riordan (2016)

The Silent Hours – Cesca Major (2015)

The Unseeing – Anna Mazzola (2016)

The Woman on the Orient Express – Lindsay Jayne Ashford (2016)

Novella

Moon in a Dead Eye – Pascal Garnier (2013)

Psychological

A Mother’s Confession – Kelly Rimmer (2016)

A Suitable Lie – Michael J Malone (2016)

The Beauty of the End – Debbie Howells (2016)

Before I Let You In – Jenny Blackhurst (2016)

Behind Closed Doors – B.A. Paris (2016)

Blind Side – Jennie Ensor (2016)

Blood Wedding – Pierre Lemaitre (2016)

Bloody Women – Helen FitzGerald (2009)

Chosen Child – Linda Huber (2016)

The Couple Next Door – Shari Lapena (2016)

Don’t You Cry – Mary Kubica (2016)

Distress Signals – Catherine Ryan Howard (2016)

The Girl With A Clock For A Heart – Peter Swanson (2014)

The Girl You Lost – Kathryn Croft (2016)

The Good Mother – A.L. Bird (2016)

I See You – Clare Mackintosh (2016)

The Ice Beneath Her – Camilla Grebe (2016)

In Her Wake – Amanda Jennings (2016)

In Too Deep – Bea Davenport (2013)

Intrusion – Mary McCluskey (2016)

The Last Thing I Remember – Deborah Bee (2016)

Lie With Me – Sabine Durrant (2016)

Lying In Wait – Liz Nugent (2016)

The Marriage Lie – Kimberly Belle (2016)

The Missing – C.L. Taylor (2016)

Missing Pieces – Heather Gudenkauf (2016)

The Mistake – Wendy James (2012)

My Husband’s Son – Deborah O’Connor (2016)

My Husband’s Wife – Jane Corry (2016)

No One Knows – J.T. Ellison (2016)

The Perfect Girl – Gilly Macmillan (2016)

Reconstructing Amelia – Kimberly McCreight (2013)

The Stepmother – Claire Seeber (2016)

The Swimming Pool – Louise Candlish  (2016)

Viral – Helen FitzGerald (2016)

Ward Zero – Linda Huber (2016)

Watching Edie – Camilla Way (2016)

When She Was Bad – Tammy Cohen (2016)

While You Were Sleeping – Kathryn Croft (2016)

White Is The Coldest Colour – John Nicholl (2015)

The Widow – Fiona Barton (2016)

The Woman in Cabin 10 – Ruth Ware (2016)

You Should Have Known – Jean Hanff Korelitz (2014)

Short Stories

Case 48: The Kidnapping of Isaiah Rae – Emma Kavanagh (2016)

Here Be Dragons – Sharon Bolton (2016)

The Intruder at Number 40 – Louise Candlish (2016)

Manipulated Lives – H.A. Leuschel (2016)

Non Fiction

A Gallery of Poisoners – Adrian Vincent (1993)

A Life Discarded – Alex Masters (2016)

The Apprentice of Split Crow Lane – Jane Housham (2016)

Castles in the Air – Alison Ridley Cubitt (2015)

The Curious Habits of Doctor Adams – Jane Robins (2013)

Death Comes Knocking – Graham Bartlett with Peter James (2016)

Did She Kill Him? – Kate Colquhoun (2014)

Last Woman Hanged – Caroline Overington (2014)

Mrs Maybrick – Victoria Blake (2008)

The Poison Principle – Gail Bell (2002)

Pretty Jane and the Viper of Kidbrooke Lane – Paul Thomas Murphy (2016)

Mrs Robinson’s Disgrace: The Private Diary of a Victorian Lady – Kate Summerscale (2013)

The Secret Poisoner – Linda Stratmann (2016)

Tea by the Nursery Fire – Noel Streatfeild (1976)

Testament of Youth – Vera Brittain (1933)

The Wicked Boy – Kate Summerscale (2016)

You can find all the reviews on this blog by Author;  A-L  M-Z

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Posted in Weekly Posts

Stacking The Shelves (January 16)

Stacking the shelves

Stacking The Shelves is all about sharing the books you’re adding to your shelves, be it buying or borrowing. From ‘real’ books you’ve purchased, a book you’ve borrowed, a book you’ve been given or an e-book they can all be shared.

Well I didn’t expect to do another one of these posts quite so soon as it sort of shows that I’m still acquiring too many books.

First up is Dead Before Morning by Geraldine Evans a book I wouldn’t have picked up if it hadn’t been for Margot’s excellent ‘Spotlight’ of this one on her magnificent blog, in fact even after this temptation I was merely adding it to the wishlist, but it was free…

Dead Before Morning

Blurb

DI Joseph Rafferty had three problems: His boss, his family and a murder. He knows which one he’d choose, if he had a choice. He’d take the murder of the ‘Faceless Lady’, any time, over the other two, even though he loves his family. Well, some of the time, anyway. Only he’s not given a choice. He must find her killer, while keeping his family’s current legal entanglements downwind of his boss. Otherwise, he risks failure, exposure and career crash. Amazon

I was delighted and thrilled to be approved for a copy of The Missing Hours by Emma Kavanagh; both her previous books Falling and Hidden were huge hits with me last year and this sounds just as good!

Blurb
The Missing Hours

A woman disappears
One moment, Selena Cole is in the playground with her children and the next, she has vanished without a trace.
A woman returns
Twenty hours later, Selena is found safe and well, but with no memory of where she has been.
What took place in those missing hours, and are they linked to the discovery of a nearby murder?
‘Is it a forgetting or a deception?’ NetGalley

The Missing Hours is going to be published on 21 April 2016

Finally, I have a copy by my new favourite publishers Twenty7; Without Trace by Simon Booker.

Simon Booker

Blurb

For four long years, journalist Morgan Vine has campaigned for the release of her childhood sweetheart Danny Kilcannon – convicted, on dubious evidence, of murdering his 14 year-old stepdaughter.
When a key witness recants, Danny is released from prison. With nowhere else to go, he relies on single mum Morgan and her teenage daughter, Lissa.
But then Lissa goes missing.
With her own child now at risk, Morgan must re-think all she knows about her old flame – ‘the one that got away’. As the media storm around the mysterious disappearance intensifies and shocking revelations emerge, she is forced to confront the ultimate question: who can we trust…?
Introducing Morgan Vine, Without Trace is Simon Booker’s debut thriller. Amazon

Without Trace will be published in eBook format on 28 January 2016 and in paperback on 16 June 2016

PicMonkey Collage TBR

TBR WATCH
Since my last count I have read 3 books, and gained 3 so I’m standing still at 174 books!
85 physical books
75 e-books
14 books on NetGalley

What have you found to read this week?

Reviews by Author A – L

A

Rachel Abbott – And So It Begins

Rachel Abbott – The Back Road DCI Tom Douglas #2

Rachel Abbott – Come A Little Closer DCI Tom Douglas #7

Rachel Abbott – Kill Me Again DCI Tom Douglas #5

Rachel Abbott – Nowhere Child DCI Tom Douglas #4.5

Rachel Abbott – The Sixth Window DCI Tom Douglas #6

Rachel Abbott – Sleep Tight DCI Tom Douglas #3

Rachel Abbott – Stranger Child DCI Tom Douglas #4

Aimee Alexander – The Accidental Life of Greg Millar

Judith Allnatt – The Moon Field

Buffy Andrews – The Moment Keeper

Isabel Ashdown – Little Sister

Lindsay Jayne Ashford – The Woman On The Orient Express

Lucy Atkins – The Missing One

Lucy Atkins – The Night Visitor

Kate Atkinson – Life After Life 

Margaret Atwood – Alias Grace

Flourish.jpgB

Fredrik Backman – My Grandmother Sends Her Regards and Apologises

Fredrik Backman – The Scandal

Fredrik Backman – Us Against You

Alison Baillie – A Fractured Winter 

Alison Baillie – Sewing The Shadows Together

Beryl Bainbridge – An Awfully Big Adventure

Beryl Bainbridge – Harriet Said

Beryl Bainbridge – Master Georgie

Beryl Bainbridge – Sweet William

Beryl Bainbridge – Winter Garden

Lisa Ballantyne – Little Liar

Lisa Ballantyne – Redemption Road

Laura Barnett – Greatest Hits

Laura Barnett – The Versions of Us

Helen Barrell – Poison Panic

Graham Bartlett – Death Comes Knocking

Fiona Barton – The Child

Fiona Barton – The Suspect 

Fiona Barton – The Widow

Belinda Bauer – The Beautiful Dead

Belinda Bauer – The Facts of Life and Death

Belinda Bauer – Rubbernecker

Belinda Bauer – The Shut Eye

Belinda Bauer – Snap

Nina Bawden – Ruffian On The Stair

Nina Bawden – The Solitary Child

Simon Beckett – The Chemistry of Death David Hunter #1

Simon Beckett – The Restless Dead David Hunter #5

Simon Beckett – Stone Bruises

Deborah Bee – The Last Thing I Remember

Gail Bell – The Poison Principle

Kimberly Belle – The Marriage Lie

Marie Benedict – Carnegie’s Maid

John Bennett – The Cromwell Street Murders 

Flynn Berry – A Double Life

Mark Billingham – Die of Shame

Mark Billingham – The Dying Hours

Mark Billingham – Love Like Blood

Mark Billingham – Rush of Blood

Mark Billingham – Time of Death

Amy Bird – The Good Mother

Amy Bird – Hide and Seek

Katarina Bivald – The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend

Jenny Blackhurst – Before I Let You In

Jenny Blackhurst – The Foster Child

Jenny Blackhurst – How I Lost You

Jenny Blackhurst – The Night She Died

Sam Blake – In Deep Water Cat Connolly #2

Sam Blake – Little Bones Cat Connolly #1

Victoria Blake – Mrs Maybrick

Chris Blamires – A Time of Myths

Sharon Bolton – The Craftsman

Sharon Bolton – A Dark and Twisted Tide Lacey Flint #4

Sharon Bolton – Daisy In Chains

Sharon Bolton – Dead Woman Walking

Sharon Bolton – Here Be Dragons Lacey Flint Short Story

Sharon Bolton – If Snow Hadn’t Fallen Lacey Flint Short Story

Sharon Bolton – Like This Forever Lacey Flint #3

Sharon Bolton – Little Black Lies

Sharon Bolton – Now You See Me Lacey Flint #1

Jan Bondeson – The Ripper of Waterloo Road

Simon Booker – Without Trace

Simon Bourke – And the Birds Kept on Singing

William Boyd – The Dreams of Bethany Mellmoth

John Boyne – Crippen: A Novel of a Murder

John Boyne – The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas

John Boyne – The Heart’s Invisible Furies

Mary Elizabeth Braddon – Lady Audley’s Secret

Melvyn Bragg – Grace and Mary

Rebecca Bradley – Shallow Waters

Carys Bray – The Museum of You

R.C. Bridgestock – When a Killer Strikes

Ray Britain – The Last Thread

Vera Brittain – Testament of Youth

Frances Brody – A Snapshot of Murder #10 Kate Shackleton

Frances Brody – Death at the Seaside Kate Shackleton #8

Frances Brody – Death in the Stars  Kate shackleton #9

Chris Brookmyre – Want You Gone

Dea Brøvig – The Last Boat Home

Antony M Brown – The Red Address Book

Alison Bruce – The Promise DC Gary Goodhew #6

Alison Bruce – The Siren DC Gary Goodhew #2

Elizabeth Buchan – The New Mrs Clifton

Suzanne Bugler – The Safest Place

Alafair Burke – The Ex

Graeme Macrae Burnet – His Bloody Project

Alexandra Burt – Little Girl Gone

Sian Busby – A Commonplace Killing

Sian Busby – The Cruel Mother

Flourish.jpgC

Alex Caan – Cut To The Bone

Jane Cable – The Faerie Tree

Graeme Cameron – Normal

Louise Candlish – The Disappearance of Emily Marr

Louise Candlish – The Intruder at Number 40

Louise Candlish – Other People’s Secrets

Louise Candlish – Our House

Louise Candlish – The Sudden Departure of the Frasers

Louise Candlish – The Swimming Pool

Joanna Cannon – Three Things About Elsie

Truman Capote – Breakfast at Tiffany’s 

Truman Capote – In Cold Blood

Laura Carlin – The Wicked Cometh

Elisabeth Carpenter – Only a Mother 

 Emmanuel Carrère – The Adversary

Jane Carter Woodrow – Rose West: A Making of a Monster

Tania Carver – The Doll’s House

James Cary – Crossword Ends In Violence (5)

Jane Casey – After The Fire Maeve Kerrigan #6

Jane Casey – Cruel Acts Maeve Kerrigan #8

Jane Casey – The Kill Maeve Kerrigan #5

Jane Casey – Left for Dead Maeve Kerrigan #0.5

Jane Casey – Let The Dead Speak Maeve Kerrigan #7

Jane Casey – The Stranger You Know Maeve Kerrigan #4

Steve Cavanagh – The Defence

HS Chandler – Degrees of Guilt

Eve Chase – Black Rabbit Hall

Eve Chase – The Vanishing of Audrey Wilde

Agatha Christie – The A.B.C. Murders

Agatha Christie – And Then There Were None

Agatha Christie – Hickory Dickory Dock

Agatha Christie – The Murder at the Vicarage

Agatha Christie – Murder is Easy

Agatha Christie – The Murder of Roger Ackroyd

Agatha Christie – Murder on the Orient Express

Agatha Christie – One, Two, Buckle My Shoe

Agatha Christie – The Thirteen Problems

Ann Cleeves – Raven Black Shetland #1

Ann Cleeves – Silent Voices

Rory Clements – Martyr

Nicci Cloke – Lay Me Down

Deborah Cohen – Family Secrets

Tamar Cohen – The Broken

Tammy Cohen – Deadly Divorces

Tammy Cohen – Dying For Christmas

Tammy Cohen – First One Missing

Tamar Cohen – The Mistress’s Revenge

Tamar Cohen – Someone Else’s Wedding

Tammy Cohen – They All Fall Down

Tammy Cohen – When She Was Bad

Emma Cole – Every Secret Thing

Kate Colquhoun – Did She Kill Him?

Barbara Comyns – Our Spoons Came From Woolworths

Michael Stewart Conway – Caversham Lock

Michael Stewart Conway – Caversham Road

Barabara Copperthwaite – Flowers for the Dead

Elizabeth Cooke – Rutherford Park

Natasha Cooper – No Escape

Julie Corbin – Now That You’re Gone

Jane Corry – Blood Sisters

Jane Corry – My Husband’s Wife

Andrew Cowan – Worthless Men

Edmund Crispin – The Moving Toyshop

Kathryn Croft – The Girl With No Past

Kathryn Croft – The Girl You Lost

Kathryn Croft – While You Were Sleeping

Julia Crouch – Her Husband’s Lover

Julia Crouch – Tarnished

Julia Crouch – The Long Fall

Sinéad Crowley – Are You Watching Me? DS Claire Boyle #2

Sinéad Crowley – Can Anybody Help Me? DS Claire Boyle #1

Sinéad Crowley – One Bad Turn DS Claire Boyle #3

Fiona Cummins – The Neighbour 

Chris Curran – Her Deadly Secret

Judith Cutler – Green and Pleasant Land

Flourish.jpgD

Suellen Dainty – The Housekeeper

Paula Daly – Just What Kind of Mother Are You?

Paula Daly – Keep Your Friends Close

Paula Daly – The Mistake I Made

Paula Daly – Open Your Eyes

Paula Daly – The Trophy Child

Sandra Danby – Ignoring Gravity

Nina Darnton – The Perfect Mother

Bea Davenport – In Too Deep

Bea Davenport – This Little Piggy

Caitlin Davies – Family Likeness

Caitlin Davies – The Ghost Of Lily Painter

Jane Davis – A Funeral For An Owl

Jane Davis – Half-Truths And White Lies

Jane Davis – I Stopped Time

Jane Davis – Smash All The Windows 

Jane Davis – These Fragile Things

Elizabeth Day – Home Fires

Kit de Waal – My Name is Leon

Kit de Waal – The Trick to Time

Luke Delaney – The Toy Taker

Robert Dinsdale – Little Exiles

Anthony Doerr – All The Light We Cannot See

Charlie Donlea – Don’t Believe It

Emma Donoghue – Room

Louise Doughty – Apple Tree Yard

Louise Douglas – The Secret By The Lake

Louise Douglas – Your Beautiful Lies

Renita D’Silva – Monsoon Memories

Renita D’Silva – The Forgotten Daughter

Renita D’Silva – The Stolen Girl

Ruth Dugdall – Humber Boy B #3

Ruth Dugdall – Nowhere Girl #4

Ruth Dugdall – The Sacrificial Man #2

Ruth Dugdall – The Woman Before Me #1

Sabine Durrant – Lie With Me

Sabine Durrant – Remember Me This Way

Sabine Durrant – Take Me In

Sabine Durrant – Under Your Skin

Claire Dyer – The Last Day

Claire Dyer – The Perfect Affair

Flourish.jpgE

Piu Marie Eatwell – The Dead Duke, His Secret Wife and the Missing Corpse

 Mark Edwards – The Magpies

Mark Edwards – Because She Loves Me

Martin Edwards – The Arsenic Labyrinth Lake District Mystery #3

Martin Edwards – The Cipher Garden Lake District Mystery #2

Martin Edwards – The Coffin Trail Lake District Mystery #1

Martin Edwards – Dancing for the Hangman

Martin Edwards – The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books 

Elsebeth Egholm – Dead Souls

Susan Eliot Wright – The Things We Never Said

Susan Eliot Wright – The Secrets We Left Behind

J.T. Ellison – No One Knows

Nuala Ellwood – My Sister’s Bones

Jennie Ensor – Blind Side

Jennie Ensor – The Girl in His Eyes

Colin Evans – The Killing of Georgie Moore

Elizabeth Evans – As Good As Dead

Harriet Evans – A Place For Us

Lissa Evans – Crooked Heart

Natalie Meg Evans – The Dress Thief

Felicity Everett – The People at Number 9

Flourish.jpgF

Jane Fallon – Faking Friends

Jane Fallon – My Sweet Revenge

Jane Fallon – Skeletons 

Jane Fallon – Tell Me A Secret

Natalie Fergie – The Sewing Machine

Clare Fisher – All The Good Things

Helen FitzGerald – Bloody Women

Helen FitzGerald – The Cry

Helen FitzGerald – The Exit

Helen FitzGerald – My Last Confession

Helen FitzGerald – Viral

Rebecca Fleet – The House Swap

Emma Flint – Little Deaths

Gillian Flynn – Gone Girl

Lucy Foley – The Book of Lost and Found

Margaret Forster – My Life in Houses

Margaret Forster – The Unknown Bridesmaid

Karin Fossum – The Drowned Boy

Karin Fossum – The Murder of Harriet Krohn

John Foster – Nine Times In Ten

N.J. Fountain – Painkiller

Christopher Fowler – The Book of Forgotten Authors

Dorothy Fowler – What Remains Behind

Margalit Fox – Conan Doyle for the Defence

Patty Francis- The Liars Diary

Ros Franey – The Dissent of Annie Lang

Sarah Franklin – Shelter

Caz Frear – Sweet Little Lies

Kimberley Freeman -Wildflower Hill

Nicci French – Friday On My Mind Frieda Klein #5

Nicci French – Saturday Requiem Frieda Klein #6

Nicci French – Sunday Morning Coming Down Frieda Klein #7

Nicci French – Thursday’s Child Frieda Klein #4

Nicci French – Waiting for Wednesday Frieda Klein #3

Paul French – Midnight in Peking

Tana French – Broken Harbour

Tana French – The Secret Place

Tana French – The Trespasser

Tana French – The Wych Elm

Flourish.jpgG

Christine Gardner – Not Guilty

Helen Garner – This House of Grief

Pascal Garnier – The A26

Pascal Garnier – Boxes

Pascal Garnier – Moon in a Dead Eye

Alison Gaylin – What Remains of Me

Hélène Gestern – The People in the Photo

Elizabeth Gifford – The Secrets Of The Sea House

Elizabeth Gill – The Fall and Rise of Lucy Charlton

Andrea Gillies – The Enlightenment of Nina Findlay

Lesley Glaister – Nina Todd Has Gone

Holly Goddard Jones – The Next Time You See Me

Celina Grace – Hushabye

Celina Grace – Requiem

Celina Grace – Imago

Eliza Graham – Another Day Gone

Eliza Graham – The One I Was

Peter Graham – Anne Perry and the Murder of the Century

Camilla Grebe – The Ice Beneath Her

Graham Greene – The End of the Affair

Iona Grey – Letters to the Lost

Isabelle Grey – The Bad Mother

Isabelle Grey – Good Girls Don’t Die Grace Fisher #1

Isabelle Grey – Shot Through The Heart Grace Fisher #2

Isabelle Grey – The Special Girls Grace Fisher #3

Isabelle Grey – Wrong Way Home Grace Fisher #4

Michael Griesbach – The Innocent Killer

Elly Griffiths – The Blood Card Stephens & Mephisto #3

Elly Griffiths – The Chalk Pit Ruth Galloway #9

Elly Griffiths – The Dark Angel Ruth Galloway #10

Elly Griffiths – The Ghost Fields Ruth Galloway #7

Elly Griffiths – The Outcast Dead Ruth Galloway #6

Elly Griffiths – Smoke and Mirrors Stephens &  Mephisto #2

Elly Griffiths – The Stranger Diaries

Elly Griffiths – The Stone Circle Ruth Galloway #11

Elly Griffiths – The Woman in Blue Ruth Galloway #8

Elly Griffiths – The Vanishing Box Stephens &  Mephisto #4

Elly Griffiths – The Zig-Zag Girl Stephens & Mephisto #1

Rebecca Griffiths – A Place to Lie

Lauren Groff – Fates and Furies

Heather Gudenkauf – Little Mercies

Heather Gudenkauf – Missing Pieces

Heather Gudenkauf – Not A Sound

Flourish.jpg

H

Araminta Hall – Dot

Araminta Hall – Our Kind of Cruelty

Kate Hamer – The Doll Funeral

Penny Hancock – A Trick of the Mind

Helene Hanff – 84 Charing Cross Road

Jean Hanff Korelitz – You Should Have Known

John F Hanley – Against The Tide

John F Hanley – The Last Boat

Kristen Hannah – The Nightingale

Sophie Hannah – A Game For All The Family

Sophie Hannah – Did You See Melody?

Sophie Hannah – The Carrier

Sophie Hannah – The Narrow Bed

Sophie Hannah – The Telling Error

Emma Hannigan – The Summer Guests

Emma Hannigan – The Heart of Winter

Kathryn Harkup – A is For Arsenic: The Poisons of Agatha Christie

Claire Harman – Murder by the Book 

Fiona Harper – The Other Us

Jane Harper – The Dry

Jane Harper – The Lost Man

L.P.Hartley – The Go-Between

L.P. Hartley – The Shrimp and the Anemone

Mary S. Hartman – Victorian Murderesses

C.J. Hartner – Rowan’s Well

David Hastings – The Many Deaths of Mary Dobie

Paula Hawkins – The Girl On The Train

Antonia Hayes – Relativity

Samantha Hayes – Until You’re Mine

Samatha Hayes – Before You Die

Samantha Hayes – You Belong To Me

Elizabeth Haynes – Behind Closed Doors (DCI Louisa Smith #2)

Elizabeth Haynes – Human Remains

Elizabeth Haynes – The Murder of Harriet Monckton

Elizabeth Haynes – Never Alone

Elizabeth Haynes – Promises to Keep

Elizabeth Haynes – Under A Silent Moon (DCI Louisa Smith #1)

Katherine Hayton – Found Near WaterKatherine Hayton – Found Near Water

Julia Heaberlin – Black-Eyed Susans

Emma Healey – Elizabeth Is Missing

James Henry – Blackwater

James Henry – Frost at Midnight DI Frost Prequel #4

James Henry – Morning Frost DI Frost Prequel #3

Sally Hepworth – The Family Next Door

Sally Hepworth – The Mother-in-Law

Sally Hepworth – The Things We Keep

Patricia Highsmith – The Talented Mr Ripley

Sarah Hilary – Come And Find Me DI Marnie Rome #5

Sarah Hilary – No Other Darkness DI Marnie Rome #2

Sarah Hilary – Quieter Than Killing DI Marnie Rome #4

Sarah Hilary – Someone Else’s Skin DI Marnie Rome #1

Sarah Hilary – Tastes Like Fear DI Marnie Rome #3

Mark Hill – The Two O’clock Boy

Reginald Hill – A Clubbable Woman Dalziel & Pascoe #1

Reginald Hill – Bones and Silence Dalziel & Pascoe #11

Reginald Hill – Child’s Play Dalziel & Pascoe #9

Reginald Hill – Pictures of Perfection Dalziel & Pascoe #14

Reginald Hill – The Stranger House

Reginald Hill – Under World Dalziel & Pascoe #10

Susan Hill – Soul of Discretion

Victoria Hislop – The Island

Frances Hodgeson Burnett- The Shuttle

Andrea Hodgkinson – Spilt Milk

Jiliane Hoffman – All The Little Pieces

Phil Hogan – A Pleasure and a Calling

Eva Holland – The Daughter’s Secret

Anna Hope – The Ballroom

Anna Hope – Wake

Ellen Horan – 31 Bond Street 

Rachel Hore – Last Letter Home

Rachel Hore – The Silent Tide

Rachel Hore – A Week in Paris

Babs Horton – A Jarful of Angels

Jane Housham – The Apprentice of Split Crow Lane

Catherine Ryan Howard – Distress Signals

Debbie Howells – The Beauty of the End

Debbie Howells – The Bones of You

Lisa Howorth – Flying Shoes

Linda Huber – Chosen Child

Linda Huber – The Cold Cold Sea

Linda Huber – Ward Zero

Cara Hunter – Close to Home

Cara Hunter – In the Dark

Cara Hunter – No Way Out

Flourish.jpgI

Viktor Arnar Ingolfsson – House Of Evidence

Kim Izzo – Seven Days in May

Flourish.jpgJ

David Jackson – A Tapping At My Door Nathan Cody #1

David Jackson – Don’t Make a Sound Nathan Cody #3

David Jackson – Hope to Die Nathan Cody #2

David Jackson – Pariah Callum Doyle #1

Maggie James – Blackwater Lake

Maggie James – His Kidnapper’s Shoes

P.D. James – The Lighthouse

P.D. James & T.A. Critchley – The Maul And The Pear Tree

Peter James – A Twist Of  The Knife

Peter James – Dead at First Sight Roy Grace #15

Peter James – Dead If You Don’t Roy Grace #14

Peter James – Dead Man’s Time Roy Grace #9

Peter James – Love You Dead Roy Grace #12

Peter James – Need You Dead Roy Grace #13

Peter James – Want You Dead Roy Grace #10

Peter James – You Are Dead Roy Grace #11

Rebecca James – Sweet Damage

Wendy James – The Golden Child

Wendy James – The Mistake

Wendy James – Out Of The Silence

Anna Jaquiery – Death In The Rainy Season

Charlotte Jay – A Hank Of Hair

Amanda Jennings – The Cliff House

Amanda Jennings – In Her Wake

Lisa Jewell – Before I Met You

Lisa Jewell – I Found You

Lisa Jewell – The Girls

Lisa Jewell – The House We Grew Up In

Lisa Jewell – The Making of Us

Lisa Jewell – Then She Was Gone

Lisa Jewell – The Third Wife

Lisa Jewell – The Truth About Melody Browne

Lisa Jewell – Watching You 

Jennifer Johnston – This is Not a Novel

Catherine Jones – Wonder Girls

Jack Jordan – Anything For Her

Alison Joseph – The Dying Light

Flourish.jpgK

Stephen Kaminski – Don’t Cry Over Killed Milk

Emma Kavanagh – Case 48: The Kidnapping of Isaiah Rae Short Story

Emma Kavanagh – Falling

Emma Kavanagh – Hidden

Emma Kavanagh – The Killer on the Wall

Emma Kavanagh – The Missing Hours

Emma Kavanagh – To Catch A Killer

Linda Kavanagh – The Secret Wife

Erin Kelly – Broadchurch

Erin Kelly – Broadchurch: The End Is Where It Begins

Erin Kelly – Broachurch: The Letter

Erin Kelly – Broadchurch: Old Friends

Erin Kelly – Broadchurch: Over The Side

Erin Kelly – Broadchurch: Protection

Erin Kelly – Broadchurch: One More Secret

Erin Kelly – Broadchurch: The Leaving of Claire Ripley

Erin Kelly – Broadchurch: Thirteen Hours

Erin Kelly – He Said/She Said

Erin Kelly – The Burning Air

Erin Kelly – The Ties That Bind

Jim Kelly – The Water Clock

Claire Kendal – The Book of You

Christobel Kent – The Crooked House

Hannah Kent – Burial Rites

Hannah Kent – The Good People

Caroline Kepnes – You

Margot Kinberg – Past Tense

Judith Kinghorn – The Memory Of Lost Senses

Liza Klaussmann – Tigers in Red Weather

Renée Knight – Disclaimer

Renée Knight – The Secretary

Herman Koch – Dear Mr M

Herman Koch – The Dinner

Herman Koch – Summer House with Swimming Pool

Jeffrey H Konis – The Conversations We Never Had

Dorothy Koomson  – The Brighton Mermaid

Dorothy Koomson – The Flavours of Love

Dorothy Koomson – That Girl From Nowhere

Mary Kubica – Don’t You Cry

Mary Kubica – The Good Girl

Mary Kubica – Pretty Baby

Mary Kubica – When the Lights Go Out

Flourish.jpgL

Lynda La Plante – Good Friday Tennison #3

Lynda La Plante – Murder Mile Tennison #4

Camilla Lackberg – Buried Angels

Camilla Läckberg – The Girl in the Woods

Camilla Lackberg – The Ice Child

Camilla Lackberg – The Lost Boy

Camilla Lackberg – The Stonecutter

Stephanie Lam – The Mysterious Affair at Castaway House

Ali Land – Good Me, Bad Me

Harriet Lane – Her

Shari Lapena – The Couple Next Door

Catherine Law – The September Garden

Deborah Lawrenson – The Sea Garden

Anthony Le Moignan – A Long Goodbye

Caroline Lea -When the Sky Fell Apart

Simon Lelic – The House

Simon Lelic – The Liar’s Room

Pierre Lemaitre – Blood Wedding

Pierre Lemaitre – Three Days and a Life

Judith Lennox – The Jeweller’s Wife

Judith Lennox – One Last Dance

H.A. Leuschel – Manipulated Lives

Luana Lewis – Don’t Stand So Close

Nell Leyshon – The Colour Of Milk

Alison Light – Common People

Alison Light – Mrs Woolf and the Servants

Elizabeth Little – Dear Daughter

Joan Lock – Dead Centre

Shari Low – One Day in December

Marie Belloc Lowndes – The Lodger

Natalie Lucus – Sixteen Sixty-One

Sofia Lundberg – The Red Address Book

Rosamund Lupton – The Quality of Silence

Jane Lythell – The Lie of You 

Flourish.jpg

20 Books of Summer 2019!


Well once again I am joining Cathy746 with her annual 20 books of summer challenge, a challenge I have met with varying degrees of success (or failure). Normally I choose only physical books from my own shelves but with my lacklustre reading this year I have decided that I need to keep this easy with a wide variety of genres and types to keep me going…

So like Cathy from 3 June until 3 September I will be attempting to read my 20 Books of Summer.

You join in with your own 20 (or 10, or 15!), and link your post with your choices to the Linky on Cathy’s blog so we can all cheer each other on!

So without further ado here are my books:

1. The Adventures of Maud West, Lady Detective by Susannah Stapleton.

NetGalley – eBook – Non-Fiction

Maud West ran her detective agency in London for more than thirty years, having started sleuthing on behalf of society’s finest in 1905.

Her exploits grabbed headlines throughout the world but, beneath the public persona, she was forced to hide vital aspects of her own identity in order to thrive in a class-obsessed and male-dominated world. And – as Susannah Stapleton reveals – she was a most unreliable witness to her own life.

Who was Maud? And what was the reality of being a female private detective in the Golden Age of Crime? Interweaving tales from Maud West’s own ‘casebook’ with social history and extensive original research,
Stapleton investigates the stories Maud West told about herself in a quest to uncover the truth. With walk-on parts by Dr Crippen and Dorothy L. Sayers, Parisian gangsters and Continental blackmailers, The Adventures of Maud West, Lady Detective is both a portrait of a woman ahead of her time and a deliciously salacious glimpse into the underbelly of ‘good society’ during the first half of the twentieth century.

 

Read the review from Cleopatra Loves Books 

 

 

 

 

2. The Trouble with Goats and Sheep by Joanna Cannon

Own Copy – Physical – Crime Fiction

England,1976.

Mrs Creasy is missing and The Avenue is alive with whispers. As the summer shimmers endlessly on, ten-year-olds Grace and Tilly decide to take matters into their own hands.

And as the cul-de-sac starts giving up its secrets, the amateur detectives will find much more than they imagined…

 

3. Perfect Remains by Helen Fields

Own Copy – eBook – Crime Fiction – Series

On a remote Highland mountain, the body of Elaine Buxton is burning. All that will be left to identify the respected lawyer are her teeth and a fragment of clothing.

In the concealed back room of a house in Edinburgh, the real Elaine Buxton screams into the darkness…

Detective Inspector Luc Callanach has barely set foot in his new office when Elaine’s missing persons case is escalated to a murder investigation. Having left behind a promising career at Interpol, he’s eager to prove himself to his new team. But Edinburgh, he discovers, is a long way from Lyon, and Elaine’s killer has covered his tracks with meticulous care.

It’s not long before another successful woman is abducted from her doorstep, and Callanach finds himself in a race against the clock. Or so he believes … The real fate of the women will prove more twisted than he could have ever imagined.

 

4. I know Who You Are by Alice Feeney

Own Copy – Audiobook – Psychological Thriller

Aimee Sinclair: the actress everyone thinks they know but can’t remember where from. But I know exactly who you are. I know what you’ve done. And I am watching you.
When Aimee comes home and discovers her husband is missing, she doesn’t seem to know what to do or how to act. The police think she’s hiding something and they’re right, she is – but perhaps not what they thought. Aimee has a secret she’s never shared, and yet, she suspects that someone knows. As she struggles to keep her career and sanity intact, her past comes back to haunt her in ways more dangerous than she could have ever imagined.

 

5. Victorian Murders by Jan Bondeson

Own Copy – Physical Book – Non-Fiction

This book features fifty-six Victorian cases of murder covered in the sensational weekly penny journal the Illustrated Police News between 1867 and 1900.
Some of them are famous, like the Bravo Mystery of 1876, the Llangibby Massacre of 1878 and the Mrs Pearcey case of 1890; others are little-known, like the Acton Atrocity of 1880, the Ramsgate Mystery of 1893 and the Grafton Street Murder of 1894. Take your ticket for the house of horrors.

 

 

6. Conviction by Denise Mina

NetGalley – eBook – Psychological Thriller

It’s just a normal morning for Anna McDonald. Gym kits, packed lunches, getting everyone up and ready. Until she opens the front door to her best friend, Estelle. Anna turns to see her own husband at the top of the stairs, suitcase in hand. They’re leaving together and they’re taking Anna’s two daughters with them.

Left alone in the big, dark house, Anna can’t think, she can’t take it in. With her safe, predictable world shattered, she distracts herself with a story: a true-crime podcast. There’s a sunken yacht in the Mediterranean, multiple murders and a hint of power and corruption. Then Anna realises she knew one of the victims in another life. She is convinced she knows what happened. Her past, so carefully hidden until now, will no longer stay silent.

This is a murder she can’t ignore, and she throws herself into investigating the case. But little does she know, her past and present lives are about to collide, sending everything she has worked so hard to achieve into freefall.

 

7. Saplings by Noel Streatfeild

Own Copy – Physical Book – Classic

Noel Streatfeild is best known as a writer for children, but had not thought of writing for them until persuaded to re-work her first novel as Ballet Shoes; this had sold ten million copies by the time of her death.

Saplings (1945), her tenth book for adults, is also about children: a family with four of them, to whom we are first introduced in all their secure Englishness in the summer of 1939.

‘Her purpose is to take a happy, successful, middle-class pre-war family – and then track in miserable detail the disintegration and devastation which war brought to tens of thousands of such families,’ writes the psychiatrist Dr Jeremy Holmes in his Afterword. Her ‘supreme gift was her ability to see the world from a child’s perspective’ and ‘she shows that children can remain serene in the midst of terrible events as long as they are handled with love and openness.’ She understood that ‘the psychological consequences of separating children from their parents was glossed over in the rush to ensure their physical survival… It is fascinating to watch Streatfeild casually and intuitively anticipate many of the findings of developmental psychology over the past fifty years.’ ‘A study of the disintegration of a middle-class family during the turmoil of the Second World War, and quite shocking’ wrote Sarah Waters in the Guardian. Saplings was a ten-part serial on BBC Radio 4 in 2004.

 

8. Oustide Looking In by Michael Wood

Own Copy – eBook – Crime Fiction – Series

When elderly George Rainsford goes to investigate a suspicious noise one night, the last thing he expects to find is a bloodbath. A man has been killed and a woman brutally beaten, left for dead.

The victims are Lois Craven and Kevin Hardaker – both married, but not to each other. Their spouses swear they knew nothing of the affair and, besides, they both have alibis for the attack. With nothing else to link the victims, the investigation hits a dead end.

The pressure is on for investigating officer, DCI Matilda Darke: there’s a violent killer on the loose, and it looks like her team members are the new targets. With no leads and no suspects, it’s going to take all Matilda’s wits to catch him, before he strikes again.

 

9. Britt-Marie Was Here by Fredrik Backman

Own Copy – Audiobook – Contemporary Fiction

For as long as anyone can remember, Britt-Marie has been an acquired taste. It’s not that she’s judgemental, or fussy, or difficult – she just expects things to be done in a certain way. A cutlery drawer should be arranged in the right order, for example (forks, knives, then spoons). We’re not animals, are we?

But behind the passive-aggressive, socially awkward, absurdly pedantic busybody is a woman who has more imagination, bigger dreams and a warmer heart than anyone around her realizes.

So when Britt-Marie finds herself unemployed, separated from her husband of 20 years, left to fend for herself in the miserable provincial backwater that is Borg – of which the kindest thing one can say is that it has a road going through it – and somehow tasked with running the local football team, she is a little unprepared. But she will learn that life may have more to offer her that she’s ever realised, and love might be found in the most unexpected of places.

10. 99 Red Balloons by Elisabeth Carpenter

Own Copy – eBook – Psychological Thriller

wo girls go missing, decades apart. What would you do if one was your daughter?
When eight-year-old Grace goes missing from a sweetshop on the way home from school, her mother Emma is plunged into a nightmare. Her family rallies around, but as the police hunt begins, cracks begin to emerge.
What are the secret emails sent between Emma’s husband and her sister? Why does her mother take so long to join the search? And is Emma really as innocent as she seems?
Meanwhile, ageing widow Maggie Taylor sees Grace’s picture in the newspaper. It’s a photograph that jolts her from the pain of her existence into a spiralling obsession with another girl – the first girl who disappeared…

 

11. The Other Mrs Miller by Allison Dickson

NetGalley – eBook – Psychological Thriller

Two women are watching each other.
Phoebe isn’t sure when the car started showing up. At first she put it down to the scandal around her late father, but she’s certain now it’s there for her. What’s interesting about an unhappily married housewife, who barely leaves her house?

Only one knows why.
Every morning, not long before your husband leaves for work, I wait for the blinds beside your front door to twitch. You might think I’m sitting out here waiting to break into your house and add a piece of your life to my collection. Things aren’t quite that simple. It’s not a piece of your life I want.
When a new family move in across the street, it provides Phoebe with a distraction. But with her head turned she’s no longer focused on the woman in the car. And Phoebe really should be, because she’s just waiting for an opportunity to upend Phoebe’s life…

 

 

12. They Walk Among Us by Benjamin Fitton, Rosanna Fitton

Own Copy – Audiobook – Non-Fiction

A Chilling Casebook of Horrifying Hometown Crimes
How well do you really know your friends?

Neighbours, friends, doctors and colleagues. We see them every day. We trust them implicitly. But what about the British army sergeant who sabotaged his wife’s parachute? Or the lodger who took his landlady on a picnic from which she never returned? From dentists to PAs, these normal-seeming people were quietly wrecking lives, and nobody suspected a thing.

In this first book from the addictive award-winning podcast They Walk Among Us, Benjamin and Rosanna serve up small-town stories in gripping detail. They’ve hooked millions of listeners with their intricate and disturbing cases, and now they dig into ten more tales, to provide an unforgettably sinister true-crime experience, scarily close to home.

It could happen to you.

 

13. Roar by Cecilia Ahern

Borrowed – Physical Book – Short Stories

Have you ever imagined a different life?

Have you ever stood at a crossroads, undecided? Have you ever had a moment when you wanted to roar?

From much-loved, international bestseller Cecelia Ahern come stories for all of us: the women who befriend us, the women who encourage us, the women who make us brave. From The Woman Who Slowly Disappeared to The Woman Who Returned and Exchanged her Husband, discover thirty touching, often hilarious, stories and meet thirty very different women. Each discovers her strength; each realizes she holds the power to make a change.

Witty, tender, surprising, these keenly observed tales speak to us all, and capture the moment when we all want to roar.

 

 

14. The Family Upstairs by Lisa Jewell

NetGalley – eBook – Psychological Thriller

In a large house in London’s fashionable Chelsea, a baby is awake in her cot. Well-fed and cared for, she is happily waiting for someone to pick her up.
In the kitchen lie three decomposing corpses. Close to them is a hastily scrawled note.
They’ve been dead for several days.

Who has been looking after the baby?
And where did they go?
Two entangled families.
A house with the darkest of secrets.

 

 

15. The House of Stairs by Barbara Vine

Own Copy (Re read)- Physical Book – Psychological Thriller

Lizzie hasn’t seen her old friend, Bell, for some fourteen years, but when she spots her from a taxi in a London street she jumps out and pursues her despite ‘all the terrible things’ that passed between them. As Lizzie reveals those events, little by little, the women rekindle their friendship, with terrifying results …

 

 

 

16.. The Hireling by L.P. Hartley

Own Copy – Physical Book – Classic

Overcome with grief at her husband’s death, Lady Franklin, an eligible young widow, unburdens herself to Leadbitter – a gallant, hard-bitten ex-soldier who has invested his savings in the car he drives for hire – as he takes her on a series of journeys.

He in turn beguiles her with stories of his non-existent wife and children, drawing her out of her self-absorption and weaving a dream-life with Lady Franklin at its heart. Half-hoping to make his dream come true, Leadbitter takes a bold, not to say reckless, step which costs him dearly, and brings these characters’ tangled story to a dramatic and unexpected conclusion.

 

17. Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman

Own Copy – Audiobook – Contemporary Fiction

Eleanor Oliphant has learned how to survive – but not how to live

Eleanor Oliphant leads a simple life. She wears the same clothes to work every day, eats the same meal deal for lunch every day and buys the same two bottles of vodka to drink every weekend.

Eleanor Oliphant is happy. Nothing is missing from her carefully timetabled life. Except, sometimes, everything.
One simple act of kindness is about to shatter the walls Eleanor has built around herself. Now she must learn how to navigate the world that everyone else seems to take for granted – while searching for the courage to face the dark corners she’s avoided all her life.

Change can be good. Change can be bad. But surely any change is better than… fine?

 

18. The Girl in the Letter by Emily Gunis

Own Copy – eBook – Historical Fiction

A heartbreaking letter. A girl locked away. A mystery to be solved.
1956. When Ivy Jenkins falls pregnant she is sent in disgrace to St Margaret’s, a dark, brooding house for unmarried mothers. Her baby is adopted against her will. Ivy will never leave.
Present day. Samantha Harper is a journalist desperate for a break. When she stumbles on a letter from the past, the contents shock and move her. The letter is from a young mother, begging to be rescued from St Margaret’s. Before it is too late.

Sam is pulled into the tragic story and discovers a spate of unexplained deaths surrounding the woman and her child. With St Margaret’s set for demolition, Sam has only hours to piece together a sixty-year-old mystery before the truth, which lies disturbingly close to home, is lost for ever…
Read her letter. Remember her story…

 

19. The Poison Garden by Alex Marwood

NetGalley – eBook – Crime Fiction

Where Romy grew up, if someone died you never spoke of them again.

Now twenty-two, she has recently escaped the toxic confines of the cult she was raised in. But Romy is young, pregnant and completely alone – and if she is to keep herself safe in this new world, she has some important lessons to learn.

Like how there are some people you can trust, and some you must fear. And about who her family really is, and why her mother ran away from them all those years ago.

And that you can’t walk away from a dark past without expecting it to catch up with you…

 

20. The Black Sheep by Sophie McKenzie

Own Copy – Physical Book – Psychological Thriller

Your life is in danger – and the death threats are coming from someone close to you. But who?
Someone in your family is lying to you.

Francesca was widowed a year ago. Since then she has focused on her children, trying to soothe their grief as well as her own. Her husband and father never quite saw eye to eye but no one could have cared more for her in the past year than her close-knit family. Finally, she feels she might be ready to move on with life.

Until she is contacted out of the blue by someone who says he must get information to her. That her husband’s death wasn’t what it seemed. And that her family know more than they say ….

Who can Francesca trust? And what will happen to her if she puts her faith in the wrong person?