Posted in Weekly Posts

This Week in Books (October 10)

This Week In Books
Hosted by Lipsy Lost & Found my Wednesday post gives you a taste of what I am reading this week. A similar meme is run by Taking on a World of Words

Buoyed up by last weeks rare occurrence of actually finishing three whole books I’m hoping this week’s choices are equally successful.

My current read is one of my own books, and unsurprisingly for me, book three of a series and yes, I’ve not read any others about Sister Agnes!  The Dying Light by Alison Joseph has been on the TBR since 27 October 2014 and it’s starts well…

Blurb

Young and fiercely independent, Sister Agnes Bourdillon has never felt the need of a wimple to express her spirituality. But her strength is tested by her secondment to Silworth, a South London women’s prison.

She does, however, find the work compelling, as she attempts to negotiate the network of bullies and victims, loyalties and hatreds, prisoners and jailers, searching to understand the often violent histories that lie behind each woman.

Then the father of Cally Fisher, one of the most turbulent inmates, is shot dead. The chief suspect is Cally’s boyfriend. Reminded unnervingly of how she is losing her own mother, who is rapidly retreating from reality in a French nursing home, Agnes finds that she too has become entangled in a dark world that stretches further than the prison walls… Amazon

The last book I finished was Sinclair McKay’s Victorian True Crime book The Lady in the Cellar which has recently been published.



Blurb

Number 4 Euston Square was a respectable boarding house, well-kept and hospitable, like many others in Victorian London. But beneath this very ordinary veneer, there was a murderous darkness at its heart.

On 8th May 1879, the corpse of former resident, Matilda Hacker, was uncovered by chance in the coal cellar. The investigation that followed this macabre discovery stripped bare the shadow-side of Victorian domesticity, throwing the lives of everyone within into an extraordinary and destructive maelstrom. For someone in Number 4 Euston Square must have had full knowledge of what had happened to Matilda Hacker. Someone in that house had killed her. How could the murderer prove so amazingly elusive?

Bestselling author, Sinclair McKay delves into this intriguing story and sheds light on a mystery that eluded the detectives of Scotland Yard. Amazon

And next I intend to read Bonjour Tristesse by Françoise Sagan as October’s chosen read for The Classics Club.


Blurb

The French Riviera: home to the Beautiful People. And none are more beautiful than Cécile, a precocious seventeen-year-old, and her father Raymond, a vivacious libertine. Charming, decadent and irresponsible, the golden-skinned duo are dedicated to a life of free love, fast cars and hedonistic pleasures. But then, one long, hot summer Raymond decides to marry, and Cécile and her lover Cyril feel compelled to take a hand in his amours, with tragic consequences.

Bonjour Tristesse scandalized 1950s France with its portrayal of teenager terrible Cécile, a heroine who rejects conventional notions of love, marriage and responsibility to choose her own sexual freedom. Amazon

So I’ve shown you mine, what does your reading week look like?

Author:

A book lover who clearly has issues as obsessed with crime despite leading a respectable life

16 thoughts on “This Week in Books (October 10)

  1. Oh, I hope you’l enjoy The Dying Light, Cleo. I thought the characters were nicely done, and it gives an interesting look inside a modern women’s prison. I like the protagonist, too. I’ll be interested in your thoughts when you’ve finished.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. The Lady In The Cellar caught my attention as it’s true crime. I too jump into a series anywhere. Sometimes I go back and read the others and sometimes I just go on from there.

    Like

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