Posted in Weekly Posts

First Chapter ~ First Paragraph (June 5)

Welcome to another Tuesday celebrating bookish events, from Tuesday/First Chapter/Intros, hosted by Vicky from I’d Rather Be At The Beach who posts the opening paragraph (sometime two) of a book she decided to read based on the opening. Feel free to grab the banner and play along.

This week I’m sharing the opening paragraph of Wedlock: How Georgian Britain’s Worst Husband Met His Match by Wendy Moore which is one of my 20 Books of Summer 2018 Challenge.

Blurb

WEDLOCK is the remarkable story of the Countess of Strathmore and her marriage to Andrew Robinson Stoney. Mary Eleanor Bowes was one of Britain’s richest young heiresses. She married the Count of Strathmore who died young, and pregnant with her lover’s child, Mary became engaged to George Gray. Then in swooped Andrew Robinson Stoney. Mary was bowled over and married him within the week.

But nothing was as it seemed. Stoney was broke, and his pursuit of the wealthy Countess a calculated ploy. Once married to Mary, he embarked on years of ill treatment, seizing her lands, beating her, terrorising servants, introducing prostitutes to the family home, kidnapping his own sister. But finally after many years, a servant helped Mary to escape. She began a high-profile divorce case that was the scandal of the day and was successful. But then Andrew kidnapped her and undertook a week-long rampage of terror and cruelty until the law finally caught up with him. Amazon

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First Chapter ~ First Paragraph ~ Intro

1

An Affair of Honour

London, 13 January 1777

Settling down to read his newspaper by the candlelight illuminating the dining room of the Adelphi Tavern, John Hull anticipated a quiet evening. Having opened five years earlier, as an integral part of the vast riverside development designed by the Adam brothers, the Adelphi Tavern and Coffee House had established a reputation for its fine dinners and genteel company. Many an office worker like Hull, a clerk at the Government’s Salt Office, sought refuge from the clamour of the nearby Strand in the tavern’s first-floor dining room with its elegant ceiling panels depicting Pan and Bacchus in pastel shades. On a Monday evening in January, with the day’s work behind him, Hull could expect to read his journal undisturbed.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Well that sounds like quite a lovely way to spend an evening even if I’m unsure how John Hull links to the scandal that I want to know about.

What do you think? Would you keep reading? Perhaps you’ve already read this, what did you think?

Author:

A book lover who clearly has issues as obsessed with crime despite leading a respectable life

16 thoughts on “First Chapter ~ First Paragraph (June 5)

  1. To be honest, if it was a work of fiction, I’d think it was a bit heavy on unnecessary detail but knowing it’s non-fiction it gives me the feeling the author probably knows their stuff and it’s going to be packed with fascinating information.

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  2. I read this a year or so ago and thought it was a fascinating read. It really does read like fiction at times as it’s such a strange story. Hope you enjoy.

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  3. Well, it sounds like a really interesting story, Cleo. Sometimes those historical events are at least as absorbing as anything you read in fiction. I’ll be interested to know what you think of this when you’ve finished it.

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  4. That beginning really doesn’t seem to fit the blurb, but I’d read ahead to see how it works. I will admit that the time period is not one I prefer. So, I might not finish the book or even start it. Will wait and see what you think. 🙂

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