Posted in #20 Books of Summer 2016, Book Review, Books I have read

The Shrimp and the Anemone – L.P. Hartley #20booksofsummer

Book 8

Classic 4*s
Classic Fiction
4*s

Having absolutely adored The Go-Between last year I eagerly sought out another book by this twentieth century author.
The Shrimp and the Anemone is the first of a trilogy about siblings Eustace and Hilda. Eustace is the younger, a mere nine years old when we first meet him and Hilda is his older sister by four years. Hilda is strongly committed in making sure young Eustace follows the path of goodness, she is his moral guardian in all things. In fact Hilda is scary in the way she both makes Eustace do things, such as talk to an old invalid lady, which I am certain she would not have, whilst also making sure he never strains himself, being in the Edwardian parlance of the day ‘a sickly child’

The book opens with a description of a shrimp being half-eaten by an anemone and the children impotently trying to rescue it with the shrimp ultimately dying but not without it having a profound effect on poor Eustace. The author shows his immense skill in not labouring the point he is making, there is not ‘see the lesson’ tone to this part but the luminance of the writing does set the reader up well for the rest of the book.

Set in inter-war Hunstanton, on the north-west Norfolk coast L.P. Hartley renamed the area Anchorstone and the children spend hours on the beach building fantastic moats with an air of seriousness of endeavour that seems to have quite disappeared in the intervening near century. Set at the time it is, there is no escaping the importance of class, and ‘knowing your place’ with the children’s father a working man, albeit in an office, is subtly compared to the man who picks them up in the trap to take them on a day-out where Eustace is allowed to sit on the box with the driver as a special treat.

The beauty of the book is in reading about the children’s pastimes, Eustace’s illness and their relationships with other members of the household whilst at the same time glimpsing the way they are both mystified by the actions of the adults around them. One thing you can’t accuse this author of is not being able to recreate the way that children view the world, which often authors spectacularly fail to capture in all its facets. As the book progresses we meet others in the vicinity, including Dick Staverly who takes a shine to Hilda who is growing to be a beautiful young lady. Hilda is aware of the effect she has, and that there is a rival for Dick’s attention so all eyes are on her method of handling this quandary which serves to lend another facet to her character.

While the characters of the two children are exceptionally vivid, the rest of the family is far more sketchy. Their father is in turns jovial and irritated by his children, their mother died soon after the birth of their youngest sister, a mere baby. The household is completed by the stern and severe aunt who bustles in and out of the story-line mainly trying to impress the father to take more interest in his offspring.

Whilst there are parallels with The Go-Between this is a far more benign tale, so whilst a secret is at the heart of the book, it isn’t of the same type of moral nature, although it’s important enough for me to want to find out what happens to this family in the next book; The Sixth Heaven.

 

First Published UK: 1944
Publisher: Faber & Faber
No of Pages 240
Genre: Classic Fiction
Amazon UK
Amazon US

Author:

A book lover who clearly has issues as obsessed with crime despite leading a respectable life

21 thoughts on “The Shrimp and the Anemone – L.P. Hartley #20booksofsummer

    1. Thank you – another blogger mentioned this one to me on my review of The Go-Between and I’m glad I read this first part and looking forward to learning more about Eustace and Hilda in the next two.

  1. Beautiful review, Cleo. Having loved The Go-Between, I’m also very keen to read this book at some point, hopefully the other two in the trilogy as well. I can see some of the parallels with the Go-Between: the role of class in the society of the day; the focus on children and their perceptions of the mysterious workings of the adult work. It sounds like a very subtle novel.

  2. I loved this book but it’s so long ago that I read it that I actually remember very little about it other than that I thoroughly enjoyed it. Glad it’s stood the test of time! I don’t think I ever knew it was part of a trilogy – I certainly never read the other two. I’m intrigued… hurry up and read them and tell me if they’re worth it…

  3. Not an author I have read but I do like the sound of it. I may look for the Go Between first given your positive comments and those commenting.

  4. I read The Go-Between years ago (I feel like there was a well-made tv series…?) but I had no idea it was part of a series – will have to check them out.

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