Posted in Weekly Posts

Stacking the Shelves (October 3)

Stacking the shelves

Stacking The Shelves is all about sharing the books you’re adding to your shelves, be it buying or borrowing. From ‘real’ books you’ve purchased, a book you’ve borrowed, a book you’ve been given or an e-book they can all be shared.

Since I am getting so little reading done at the moment I really shouldn’t be adding any new books to my shelves, but I am!

From my beloved NetGalley my first choice is a tale which concentrates on secrets and lies; As Good As Dead by Elizabeth Evans from Bloomsbury Publishing Plc which will be published on 19 November 2015.

As Good As Dead

Blurb

Endearingly flawed and battered-around-the-edges, Charlotte has managed to fashion herself a life that balances marriage and a writing career, but now Esmé, the charming friend Charlotte betrayed at university, stands at Charlotte’s door: Surprise!
Charlotte yearns to make amends, but she’s wary. Esmé makes no mention of Charlotte’s old betrayal and the two resume their friendship, but soon enough a request from Esmé will upend Charlotte’s careful world.
Suspenseful, witty, with spot-on evocations of university life in the late 1980s, As Good as Dead performs an exquisite psychological high-wire act, exploring loves and friendships poisoned by secrets and fears. NetGalley

I also have a copy of The Good Neighbor by A.J. Banner which was published on 1 September 2015 by Lake Union Publishing.

The Good Neighbor AJ Banner

Blurb

Shadow Cove, Washington, is the kind of town everyone dreams about—quaint streets, lush forests, good neighbors. That’s what Sarah thinks as she settles into life with her new husband, Dr. Johnny McDonald. But all too soon she discovers an undercurrent of deception. And one October evening when Johnny is away, sudden tragedy destroys Sarah’s happiness.
Dazed and stricken with grief, she and Johnny begin to rebuild their shattered lives. As she picks up the pieces of her broken home, Sarah discovers a shocking secret that forces her to doubt everything she thought was true—about her neighbors, her friends, and even her marriage. With each stunning revelation, Sarah must ask herself, Can we ever really know the ones we love? NetGalley

I was especially delighted to receive an invitation to read Ruth Dugdall’s latest novel, Nowhere Girl which will be published on 31 October 2015.

Nowhere Girl

Blurb

Probation officer, Cate Austin, has moved for a fresh start, along with her daughter Amelia, to live with her police detective boyfriend, Olivier Massard. But when she realises just how casually he is taking the disappearance of Ellie, Cate decides to investigate matters for herself. She discovers Luxembourg has a dark heart. With its geographical position, could it be the centre of a child trafficking ring? As Cate comes closer to discovering Ellie’s whereabouts she uncovers a hidden world, placing herself in danger, not just from traffickers, but from a source much closer to home. NetGalley

I also have a copy of Nowhere Child by fellow Channel Islander Rachel Abbott, this is the follow up to her last book Stranger Child.

Nowhere Child

Blurb

Eight months ago Tasha Joseph ran away, and her stepmother, Emma, has been searching for her ever since. She is desperate to give Tasha the home and security she deserves. The problem is, Emma isn’t the only one looking for Tasha. The police are keen to find her too. She could be a vital witness in a criminal trial, and DCI Tom Douglas has a team constantly on the lookout for her. But Tasha remains hidden, and nobody appears to have seen her. Suddenly, the stakes are raised. Somebody is offering money – a lot of money – for information about Tasha’s whereabouts. Tom and Emma know they have never been closer to finding the young girl. But they also recognise that she has never been closer to danger. Can they find her first? She can run – but for how long can she hide? Emma, has been searching for her ever since. She is desperate to give Tasha the home and security she deserves. The problem is, Emma isn’t the only one looking for Tasha. The police are keen to find her too. She could be a vital witness in a criminal trial, and DCI Tom Douglas has a team constantly on the lookout for her. But Tasha remains hidden, and nobody appears to have seen her. Suddenly, the stakes are raised. Somebody is offering money – a lot of money – for information about Tasha’s whereabouts. Tom and Emma know they have never been closer to finding the young girl But they also recognise that she has never been closer to danger. Can they find her first? She can run – but for how long can she hide

Lastly following my review of Little Girl Gone which had a storyline that explored postpartum psychosis, Elena of Books & Reviews helpfully suggested that I read The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, so I have a copy of that too!

The Yellow Wallpaper

Blurb

The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman is a short story that, despite its length, is largely regarded as one of the most important feminist texts ever written. The story itself follows a woman’s slow descent into madness when she and her husband spend the summer in a large mansion. The text discusses many themes that would not come to light until years later, such as male dominance and women being trapped in the home. Through this, The Yellow Wallpaper masterfully blends story and theme, showing many attitude surrounding women’s health as well as their physical and mental well being. Amazon

What have you found to read this week?

Author:

A book lover who clearly has issues as obsessed with crime despite leading a respectable life

25 thoughts on “Stacking the Shelves (October 3)

  1. Looks like some good picks there!

    I’ve just started Robert Goolrick’s The Fall of Princes. Only a little way in but not thrilling me so far. Next up will be Australian author, Charlotte Wood’s new release, The Natural Way of Things.

  2. I’ve been wanting to read The Yellow Wallpaper, Cleo. I’m very glad you reminded me of it. And the Dugdall looks terrific, too. You’ve got some good reading ahead of you, I think.

  3. Wow, these all look sooo good! I am drawn to each for different reasons. The Good Neighbor is one I have on my NetGalley shelf that I haven’t yet downloaded, since I had so many already to review. But I’m eager to read it. It is quite different from the other book by the same title, by Amy Sue Nathan.

    Enjoy….and have a great week!

    1. I came across both the Good Neighbors when I was looking for one written by another author again – what are the chances of three books, all that I like the sound of, being released with the same title in such a short space of time.

  4. Great selection – thanks. You are reminding me that I need to replenish my sad bookcase since the big cull – what was I thinking?! Love the cover and idea with the Yellow Wallpaper.

  5. The Yellow Wallpaper is such a weird and oddly memorable little book. I look forward to hearing what you think of it. happy reading!

  6. I was sent an invite for the Ruth Dugdall too but genuinely can’t fit it in. I hope it’s good – her debut was certainly impressive. The Yellow Wallpaper is a great story – one of those ones that stays in the mind for a long, long time! It’s a true horror story, though psychological rather than supernatural, but that can be even more disturbing… enjoy!! 😉

  7. Wow, I’m still baffled that people actually take my reading recommendations seriously. THANK YOU. I hope you enjoy ‘The Yellow Wallpaper’ as much as a woman can enjoy those stories.

    As for your new books, Nowhere Girl sounds like the kind of book I would love as well. There is something quite sinister about Luxembourg, or at least there is on TV shows. Let’s see if it translates to the page as well.

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