Posted in Weekly Posts

Stacking The Shelves (June 27)

Stacking the shelves

Stacking The Shelves is all about sharing the books you’re adding to your shelves, be it buying or borrowing. From ‘real’ books you’ve purchased, a book you’ve borrowed, a book you’ve been given or an e-book they can all be shared!

I haven’t shown you the recent additions to my shelves for the last couple of week and once again, seeing as I’ve been being good there seems to be quite a few!

From NetGalley I am delighted to have a copy of The Girls by Lisa Jewell, I really love this authors writing style and The House We  Grew Up In is a great example of her work.
The Girls

Blurb

You live on a picturesque communal garden square, an oasis in urban London where your children run free, in and out of other people’s houses.
You’ve known your neighbours for years and you trust them. Implicitly.
You think your children are safe.
But are they really?
Midsummer night: a thirteen-year-old girl is found unconscious in a dark corner of the garden square. What really happened to her? And who is responsible? NetGalley

I also have a copy of The Insanity of Murder by Felicity Young which features Doctor Dody McCleland. I have the first of this series, An Anatomy of Death on my 20 Books of Summer challenge which I will need to read first.

The Insanity of Murder

Blurb

To Doctor Dody McCleland, the gruesome job of dealing with the results of an explosion at the Necropolis Railway Station is testing enough. But when her suffragette sister Florence is implicated in the crime, matters worsen and Dody finds her loyalty cruelly divided. Can she choose between love for her sister and her secret love for Chief Inspector Matthew Pike, the investigating officer on the case?
Dody and Pike’s investigations lead them to a women’s rest home where patients are not encouraged to read or think and where clandestine treatments and operations are conducted in an unethical and inhumane manner. Together Dody and Pike must uncover such foul play before their secret liaisons become public knowledge – and before Florence becomes the rest home’s next victim. NetGalley

I am also lucky enough to have a copy of The Mistake I Made by Paula Daly who wrote the stunning Just What Kind of Mother Are You? and Keep Your Friends Close.

The Mistake I Made

Blurb

We all think we know who we are.
What we’re capable of.

Roz is a single mother, a physiotherapist, a sister, a friend. She’s also desperate.
Her business has gone under, she’s crippled by debt and she’s just had to explain to her son why someone’s taken all their furniture away.
But now a stranger has made her an offer. For one night with her, he’ll pay enough to bring her back from the edge.
Roz has a choice to make.

Lastly I have a copy of Preserve The Dead by Brian McGilloway

Preserve The Dead

Blurb

Detective Sergeant Lucy Black is visiting her father, a patient in a secure unit in Gransha Hospital on the banks of the River Foyle. He’s been hurt badly in an altercation with another patient, and Lucy is shocked to discover him chained to the bed for safety. But she barely has time to take it all in, before an orderly raises the alarm – a body has been spotted floating in the river below…
The body of an elderly man in a grey suit is hauled ashore: he is cold dead. He has been dead for several days. In fact a closer examination reveals that he has already been embalmed. A full scale investigation is launched – could this really be the suicide they at first assumed, or is this some kind of sick joke?
Troubled and exhausted, Lucy goes back to her father’s shell of a house to get some sleep; but there’ll be no rest for her tonight. She’s barely in the front door when a neighbour knocks, in total distress – his wife’s sister has turned up badly beaten. Can she help? NetGalley

I also have added a few books to my own physical bookshelf starting with Capital Crimes: London Mysteries edited by Martin Edwards following this enticing review from Fiction Fan

Capital Crimes London Mysteries

Blurb

With its fascinating mix of people – rich and poor, British and foreign, worthy and suspicious – London is a city where anything can happen. The possibilities for criminals and for the crime writer are endless. London has been home to many of fiction’s finest detectives, and the setting for mystery novels and short stories of the highest quality. Capital Crimes is an eclectic collection of London-based crime stories, blending the familiar with the unexpected in a way that reflects the personality of the city.
Alongside classics by Margery Allingham, Anthony Berkeley and Thomas Burke are excellent and unusual stories by authors who are far less well known. The stories give a flavour of how writers have tackled crime in London over the span of more than half a century. Their contributions range from an early serial-killer thriller set on the London Underground and horrific vignettes to cerebral whodunits.
What they have in common is an atmospheric London setting, and enduring value as entertainment. Each story is introduced by the editor, Martin Edwards, who sheds light on the authors’ lives and the background to their writing. Amazon

Following my post looking at the books on my shelves that look at Women’s Lives I received many great recommendations and chose to start with this one from twitter buddy Poppy @poppypeacock; Nobody’s Child by Kate Adie

Nobody's Child

Blurb

What’s your name? Where were you born? What is your date of birth?
Simple questions that we are asked throughout our life – but what if you didn’t know the answers? Kate Adie uncovers the extraordinary, moving and inspiring stories of just such children – without mother or father, any knowledge of who they might be, or even a name to call their own.
With a curiosity inspired by her own circumstances as an adopted child, Kate shows how the most remarkable adults have survived the experience of abandonment.
From every perspective Kate Adie brings us a personal, moving and fascinating insight into the very toughest of childhood experiences – and shows what makes us who we really are. Amazon

My final addition has been on my radar for a while from a number of mentions around the blogosphere but this brilliant review by Guy Savage meant that I simply had to add This House of Grief by Helen Garner to my bookshelf.

This House of Grief

Blurb

On the evening of 4 September 2005, Robert Farquharson, a separated husband, was driving his three sons home to their mother when his car plunged into a dam. The boys, aged ten, seven, and two, drowned. Was this an act of deliberate revenge or a tragic accident? The court case became Helen Garner’s obsession. She was in the courtroom every day of Farquharson’s trial and subsequent retrial, along with countless journalists and the families of both the accused and his former wife.
In this utterly compelling book, Helen Garner tells the story of a man and his broken life. At its core is a search for truth that takes author and reader through complex psychological terrain. Garner exposes, with great compassion, that truth and justice are as complex as human frailty and morality. Goodreads

Any of these take your fancy or perhaps you’ve already read them?
What have you found to read this week? Please do share in the comments below

Author:

A book lover who clearly has issues as obsessed with crime despite leading a respectable life

28 thoughts on “Stacking The Shelves (June 27)

  1. I’ve been meaning to try Lisa Jewell’s latest books for a while. I only read One Hit Wonder, years ago! I really liked it though, and it seems like she’s really come into her own as a novelist now.

  2. Oh, I do hope you enjoy Helen Garner – I loved Joe Cinque’s Consolation, and if you enjoy This House Of Grief I’d recommend that. It’s pretty heart-rending stuff though. I love all the reissued classic crimes – the covers are sublime! I think there may be some on NG (not that I’m trying to tempt you…!) And I love a good bit of historical crime too. The 20 Days Of Summer’s a great challenge – had my Kindle with me the other day and was sitting in the sun planning to read, having completely forgotten this kind’s unreadable in bright sunlight (of which we have had lots, happily!) Good reading!

    1. I’ve wanted this one for some time as there have been loads of great comments/reviews and I saw your mention of Consolation on Guy’s blog… I’m looking at NG through half closed eyes at the moment as I need to read my 20 books of summer – count so far a measly 3!!! It’s lovely to be outside, not so good if you can’t read though 😉

  3. Oh, Cleo, you have some great reads there! I really enjoy Felicity Young’s work; I hope you’ll like that series. And I’m a fan of Martin Edwards’ work, so I’m glad to see that one in your stack too. Oh, and the McGilloway. 🙂

  4. Really, really want to read Helen Garner, but all of the books you’re accumulating sound very interesting. You’re preparing for a holiday phones unplugged, everything else neglected, just reading marathon then…

    1. Oh Marina, I wish! Although I am getting an assistant at work which may mean a little more time for reading! I live in hope and as you probably can tell I have an optimistic vision of how many books I can actually squeeze into my life 😉

  5. I’ll be interested to see what you think of the Garner of course. That book still comes into my mind a great deal. I think Garner did a marvelous job even though I didn’t agree with her on some things.

    I have a few of the Classic British mysteries but passed on Capital Crimes due to the teetering TBR pile…

  6. Oh – look forward to your thoughts on Nobody’s Child … I read it when it first came out & leant it out, shame, think it’s one I’d like to revisit.

    The House of Grief appeals … well, I want to read it but maybe appeal not the right word.

  7. I’m currently reading two ebooks. One is historical fiction – Firebird – by Susanna Kearsley. The other is the second installment of The 39 Clues series. I’m enjoying the Firebird. It has characters from The Winter Sea. And I like how The 39 Clues series was written by a collaboration of authors. This second book is as exciting as the first.

    1. I haven’t read Firebird although I did enjoy The Winter Sea – I do like good historical fiction. The 39 Clues series sounds good too – I wonder how a group of writers manage to collaborate in such a way.

  8. I like the sound of Helen Garner and Lisa Jewell. Plus would be interested to see what you think of Paula Daly as I read her first book and enjoyed it.

  9. Goodness! A huge selection this week! Thanks for the link – hope you enjoy Capital Crimes. 🙂 I read the companion one, Resorting to Murder, too, but I think the one you’ve chosen is the better of the two. I like the look of The Insanity of Murder – that’d be my pick out of your bundle this week, I think.

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