Posted in Weekly Posts

Tuesday Teaser (February 18)

Teasing Tuesday CB
Teaser Tuesdays is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by MizB of Should Be Reading. Anyone can play along! Just do the following:

• Grab your current read
• Open to a random page
• Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
• Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

My Teaser this week is from The One Plus One by Jojo Moyes

The One Plus One
Blurb

Jess Thomas wants . . .
. . . to be more than a single mum getting by day after day
. . . to do her best for her gifted but sensitive daughter Tanzie
. . . to find a way back from the loneliest place on earth
Ed Nicholls is hoping . . .
. . . he won’t go to jail
. . . there’s a way back from the biggest mistake of his life
. . . something or someone will make it all go away
Jess and Ed are . . .
. . . two strangers looking for a little kindness
. . . two lost souls with a lot to learn from each other
. . . about to find out that one plus one makes more – so much more – than two.  Amazon

Teaser

Things they had found while cleaning people’s houses:
False teeth
An escaped guinea pig
A long-lost wedding ring (they were given a box of chocolates for this)
A signed photograph of cliff Richard (no chocolates; owner denied all knowledge)
Money.

‘She thought I worked too much.’
‘They never say that on Jeremy Kyle’

Author:

A book lover who clearly has issues as obsessed with crime despite leading a respectable life

36 thoughts on “Tuesday Teaser (February 18)

  1. The human is currently reading:

    Portrait of a Killer
    Jack the Ripper Case Closed
    (by Patricia Cornwell)

    “There is no telling how much was hopelessly garbled in the Ripper murders and what evidence may have been lost, but one can be sure that the killer left traces of his identity and daily life.”

    “In 1888, it wasn’t standard practice for police or doctors to look for hairs, fibers, or other minuscule amounts of evidence that might have required microscopic examination.”

    Like

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